Edition 5, March 2016 If you cannot read this email, please click here.
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  Better Internet for Kids - Bulletin Insafe & InHope  
 
 
  Welcome to the fifth edition of the Better Internet for Kids (BIK) bulletin. This quarterly bulletin aims to keep you informed of safer and better internet issues and opportunities across Europe and beyond. In each edition, we’ll bring you a mix of news, research and resources from many of the key stakeholders in keeping children and young people safe online, be they European Safer Internet Centres, research organisations, industry partners, policy makers or experts in the field.

If you would like to forward this newsletter to a friend or a colleague, please do so using the link at the top of this message or encourage them to subscribe to receive future editions direct.

And if you have any comments on this resource, or would like to contribute to a future edition of the BIK bulletin, please contact us.
 
 
   
  Intro  
   
   
  About the Better Internet
for Kids Project
 
   
 
     
 
   
  Under the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF), the European Commission is co-funding a range of better/safer internet services, both at the European and the national level. Building on the European Strategy for a Better Internet for Children as published in 2012, the BIK core service platform aims to bring together European stakeholders in the field to work collaboratively in achieving the goal of a better internet for all. This bulletin is just one of a range of tools and services planned over the coming months.  
   
 
Data protection
 
 
FOCUS ON
 
DATA PROTECTION
 
   
 
 
  In each edition of the BIK bulletin we'll look at a topical issue - this time we look at Data protection.

On 15 December 2015, the European Commission announced - with a tangible sense of relief and delight - it had found an agreement with the European Parliament and the Council on the EU Data Protection Reform initiated in 2012 in order to make Europe fit for the digital age by putting an end to the current patchwork of data protection rules. Andrus Ansip, Vice-President for the Digital Single Market, said: “Today’s agreement is a major step towards a Digital Single Market. It will remove barriers and unlock opportunities. The digital future of Europe can only be built on trust. With solid common standards for data protection, people can be sure they are in control of their personal information. And they can enjoy all the services and opportunities of a Digital Single Market." Věra Jourová, Commissioner for Justice, Consumers and Gender Equality added, "Today we deliver on the promise of the Juncker Commission to finalise data protection reform in 2015. These new pan-European rules are good for citizens and good for businesses. Citizens and businesses will profit from clear rules that are fit for the digital age, that give strong protection and at the same time create opportunities and encourage innovation in a European Digital Single Market.

Protecting children's and young people's data privacy underpins much of the work done by child-safety advocates. Therefore, stakeholders in the Better Internet for Kids agenda would surely applaud any such reform, right? Perhaps not... Because indeed, a media storm broke out in the eleventh hour, with international headlines suggesting 'Europe is going to ban teenagers from Facebook and the internet'. As you will read further on in this BIK bulletin, reality (not to mention EU decision making) is a bit more complex. But still, it did make us wonder: did EU politicians and policy makers consider the specific rights and needs of children, both in terms of protection from harm as well as the right to access and use digital media?

Rather than trying to come up with a comprehensive answer ourselves, we reached out to a fine selection of experts with different backgrounds, asking them to respond, based on the current compromise text, to a simple question: Will the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) help to create a better internet for kids? (Yes/No, and why?). From the start, we were keen not to shape their perspectives, nor did we explicitly ask them to focus on the now famous Article 8 which states that "in relation to the offering of information society services directly to a child, the processing of personal data of a child below the age of 16 years, or if provided for by Member State law a lower age which shall not be below 13 years, shall only be lawful if and to the extent that such consent is given or authorised by the holder of parental responsibility over the child." To be sure, the minimum age of consent figures prominently across the various accounts given. And we have to admit, the combined depth and quality of contributions goes well beyond what any single person could have come up with:
  • Professor Sonia Livingstone OBE, professor in the Department of Media and Communications at LSE, reflects on the question of whether the GDPR means no more social networking for teens.
  • John Carr OBE, Expert Adviser to the European NGO Alliance for Child Safety Online (eNACSO) and others, reflects more so on the decision-making processes behind the GDPR in his article titled ‘Poor process, bad outcomes’.
  • Writing on behalf of COFACE (Confederation of Family Organisations in the EU), Policy Officer Martin Schmalzried argues that the GDPR is a flexible step in the right direction.
  • In a similar vein, Gloria González Fuster, a research professor at the Law, Science, Technology and Society (LSTS) Research Group of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), argues that the GDPR will help to create a better internet for kids… but only if we all work on it!
  • Joe McNamee, Executive Director of European Digital Rights (EDRi), gives his view on the progress of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and thinks that, while much has been done in the legislative phases, there is still a long way to go before it comes into force.
  • Recognising the importance of hearing the voice of youth in decisions that affect them, Auke Pals, 19, a part-time high school student, member of the Dutch Digital Youth Council, and a youth representative of European Digital Youth, shares his views also.
Important as critical scrutiny and reflection may be, from an awareness-raising point of view, the biggest challenge out there is to translate EU policy discussions into a language which speaks to children, young people, teachers, parents and carers. In a previous BIK bulletin, we already showcased the excellent Finnish Safer Internet Centre resource ‘Digital Gold Miners’, providing information and activities regarding big data on the internet, with a particular focus on how data is collected from internet users and how it might be subsequently used. We are now delighted to present a broader range of awareness-raising resources and activities on data protection, again coming from Insafe network members directly: Following the political agreement reached in trilogue, the final texts of the GDPR will be formally adopted by the European Parliament and Council later in 2016. The new data protection rules will become applicable two years thereafter. The extent to which the GDPR will help to create a better internet for kids will largely depend on how this EU regulatory framework is implemented (and enforced) across EU Member States. We hope that this BIK bulletin will help to set the scene for an informed yet vibrant discussion at the national level, bringing together the full variety of public and private stakeholders, including children, young people, parents, teachers and carers.

 
 
 
TRENDING TOPICS
 
 
TRENDING TOPICS
 
Latest helpline trends
 
   
 
 
  The Insafe network of helplines collects data about the types of calls that they receive and this is analysed every three months to look at trends and new and emerging issues. The most recent data collection covered the period from October - December 2015 inclusive and saw 9,274 contacts which all related to online issues. While having seen a decline in previous reporting periods, the latest set of data shows that there has once again been a rise in the number of calls relating to cyberbullying.  
 
 
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  BIK RESOURCES  
   
 
     
 
     
 
 
Image of child using tablet  
Norwegian resource on young children and screen time
 
   
 
The Norwegian Safer Internet Centre (SIC) recently published guidelines and posters containing advice about young children’s use of online technology. Health centres for infants, daycare centres and preschools have shown great interest in these guidelines, indicating a great need for knowledge on technology use from an early age. In addition to Norwegian, the resource will shortly be available in English and Sami too.
 
 
   
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Developing digital skills in the classroom
 
   
 
The European Schoolnet Academy is a platform where you can learn about innovation in the school and classroom through free online professional development courses for teachers in primary and secondary schools. Many of the courses focus on developing digital literacy skills which, for both teachers and pupils, can be an essential aspect of helping to contribute to a better internet. Courses launching soon are ’Developing digital skills in your classroom’ and ‘Games in schools’, while a course on ‘Bullying in schools’ will launch in May.
 
 
   
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  BIK YOUTH  
   
 
     
 
     
 
 
 
European Youth Panel report
 
   
 
The European Youth Panel (YEP) 2015 report, drafted by youth panellists attending the European Youth Panel (YEP) and Safer Internet Forum (SIF) 2015 has recently been published, providing an overview of the sessions and outcomes from these meetings. It is intended to serve as a dissemination tool to inform young people in Europe of the eSafety issues that youth panellists consider to be meaningful to them and their peers.
 
 
   
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  BIK RESEARCH  
   
 
     
 
     
 
 
 
Parenting for a Digital Future turns one
 
   
 
This month, Parenting for a Digital Future turned one! Since its launch in spring of last year, the project has used the latest research to answer some of the dilemmas foremost in the minds of parents, and those who support them. The Parenting for a Digital Future team, with help from guest posters, has explored:
  • How parents around the world are bringing up their children in a digital age.
  • What are parents’ visions of their children’s futures, and that of wider society.
  • The risks and opportunities that characterise the digital future.
Read highlights of some of the excellent recent content that you might have missed.
 
 
   
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School policies for the use of mobile phones and the internet in Slovenian primary schools
 
   
 
As part of its Safer Internet Day (SID) 2016 activities, the Slovenian Safer Internet Centre (SIC) conducted a survey in primary schools to gain an insight into the situation regarding the regulation of acceptable use of technology. In Slovenia, children enter primary schooling at about the age of 6 and finish at about the age of 14. The survey was issued to a sample size of 129 primary schools, with 57 responding.
 
 
   
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  BIK INDUSTRY  
   
 
     
 
     
 
 
Online security  
Kaspersky Lab releases research on young people and cyber crime
 
   
 
Research by Kaspersky Lab to mark Safer Internet Day (SID) 2016 revealed that more than one in ten (12 per cent) of 16 to 19 year olds in the UK know someone who has engaged in a cyber-activity that could be deemed illegal. The poll found a third (35 per cent) would be impressed if a friend hacked a bank’s website and replaced the homepage with a cartoon, and a deeply worrying one in ten would be impressed if a friend hacked the air traffic control systems of a local airport.
 
 
   
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  EVENTS AND CAMPAIGNS  
   
 
     
 
     
 
 
 
Safer Internet Day 2016 was a great success
 
   
 
The 13th edition of Safer Internet Day (SID) was celebrated on 9 February 2016. The theme for the day was ‘Play your part for a better internet’, encouraging all stakeholders – children and young people, parents and carers, teachers and educators, and industry and politicians – to celebrate the day and play a personal role in helping to create a better internet for all, but especially for children and young people. The day was a great success, as illustrated in the SID summary report.
 
 
   
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Get Online Week logo  
Get Online Week 2016
 
   
 
The seventh edition of the European Get Online Week (GOW) to digitally empower and employ people was celebrated on 14-20 March this year. With a record number of 29 campaign partners involved in 27 countries, the campaign again proved the necessity to raise awareness about ICT competence and the importance to see every European digitally savvy.
 
 
   
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Bulgarian hashtag campaign  
Bulgarian hashtag campaign against provocative selfies
 
   
 
For teenagers, it’s extremely important to be popular and accepted by others. Nowadays, this is easier than ever, with likes, stickers and hashtags becoming the modern expressions of approval. However, the desire for wider ‘approval’ pushes young people looking for attention to engage in potentially risky practices, such as the sharing of sexual or revealing images online. The Bulgarian Safer Internet Centre (SIC) has launched a campaign to address this.
 
 
   
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Shakespeare, iSejf and Facebook in the Czech Republic
 
   
 
During the Safer Internet Day (SID) 2016 opening ceremony in Prague, a new round of the iSejf competition was launched. The main focus of the competition is the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare, while also promoting internet safety. Thanks to a partnership with Facebook, the winner will be awarded a trip for two to London to visit the Globe Theatre and the headquarters of Facebook.
 
 
   
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