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SPRING 2017
HEI Health Equity Update

A Bittersweet Farewell

After eleven wonderful years of leading and helping build the Health Equity Institute (HEI) at SF State, I have decided to “retire” – or at least slow down a little…It has been an honor to work alongside an amazing group of faculty, staff, post-docs, and students. Together we have created a strong and vibrant institute committed to helping our diverse communities achieve their optimal health and well-being through the linkage of science, practice and policy, and through the training of future generations of social justice and equity leaders. SF State will soon initiate a national search for HEI’s next director. HEI Associate Director, Laura Mamo, will assume interim duties until a new director is hired.
 
Thanks to all of you for your love, support, and leadership over the years!
 

HEI's First Symposium A Success

HEI Professor of Sociology Allen LeBlanc with Austin Summit on Same-Sex Couples and Health organizer Deb Umberson.On November 18, 2016, the Health Equity Institute convened Bridging Silos, Building Futures: Conversations on the Future of Health Equity Research, Practice, and Policy. The event brought together academics, researchers, policy makers, funders and community partners in a one-day symposium to participate in agenda-setting towards health equity. This symposium was designed to initiate dialogue on contemporary issues of health inequalities and directions for building futures of health equity. Through three themed conversations, the symposium facilitated a dialogue and agenda-setting for the future of health equity research and practice; provided a forum to hear from funders and policy makers about their priority directions, and developed collaborative opportunities to reach these goals. Thank you to all who participated and attended!

Meet our 2017 Health Equity Student Scholars


Top row from left: Maureen Rees, Melinda Preto, Claire De Leon
Bottom row from left: Maria Acosta, Tatiana Marshal, Julabien Suitos

 
HEI is pleased to announce our Spring 2017 Health Equity Student Scholars!

This cohort of health equity scholars will be working with HEI core and affiliate faculty on a variety of research projects ranging from an assessment for the integration of equitable technologies in the medical assessment of intimate partner violence to developing curricula on structural competency for public health and social science students to a study of the ways sex and sexuality shape the global imaginaries and public health practices surrounding the Zika virus and maternal and child health. 

Highlighting HEI Faculty Publications

HEI Associate Director Laura MamoHealth Equity Institute Assistant Professor of Economics Dr. Sepideh Modrek highlights two recent titles. In the study, "Mother, daughter, doctor: Medical professionals and mother's decision making about female genital cutting in Egypt," Modrek and her colleague surveyed over 400 young mothers of girls and conducted 29 in-depth interviews with these mothers regarding attitudes about Female Genitals Cutting in Egypt.  It was documented that young mothers are seeking out doctors’ opinions on whether they should cut their daughters and, though it is illegal there, physicians are not discouraging the practice, giving legitimacy to a procedure that has serious medical risks. Therefore, the study suggest that intervention target doctors as well as mothers to eliminate the practice.

Modrek and her colleagues published the paper "Social, psychological, and physical aspects of the work environment could contribute to hypertension prevalence" in Health Affairs. The interest in the paper was not to test a specific intervention, but rather to examine what factors in the workplace were most associated with hypertension. The paper examined physical work environment, psychological work environment and work social environment. It was found that psychological demand related most strongly to hypertension at the individual level. Once accounted for these exposures as a group and factor in the number of workers who have poor exposures in each of these categories, it was found that work social environment (i.e. culture) accounted for much of the hypertension risk, suggesting that employers may want to think beyond wellness initiates to improve the health of their workforce.

Modrek, S., & Sieverding, M. (2016). Mother, daughter, doctor: Medical professionals and mother's decision making about female genital cutting in Egypt. International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, 42(2), 81-92. doi:10.1363/42e1116

Rehkopf, D. H., Modrek, S., Cantley, L. F., & Cullen, M. R. (2017). Social, psychological, and physical aspects of the work environment could contribute to hypertension prevalence. Health Affairs: The Work/Health Relationship, 36(2), 258-265. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2016.1186
Health Equity Institute Associate Professor of Kinesiology Dr. Charmayne Hughes published the article “Robotic wrist training after stroke: Adaptive modulation of assistance in pediatric rehabilitation” in Robotics and Autonomous Systems. In collaboration with colleagues from the Italian Institute of Technology and Nanyang Technological University, this study demonstrates that robotic rehabilitation that features an adaptive control algorithm can lead to positive changes in upper limb coordination and function after pediatric stroke.

Marini, F., Squeri, V. Hughes, C.M.L., Doglio, L., Sandid, G., Moretti, P., Morasso, P., & Masia, L. (2017). Robotic wrist training after stroke: Adaptive modulation of assistance in pediatric rehabilitation. Robotics and Autonomous Systems: Special Issue on Human-oriented Approaches for Assistive and Rehabilitation Robotics, 91, 169-178. DOI: 10.1016/j.robot.2017.01.006.
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