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FDC Newsletter September 17, 2013
P.O. Box 1146
Marblehead, Mass. 01945
877-FDC-FARM
www.farmdirectcoop.org

newsletter@farmdirectcoop.org

2013 Coop Dates

Tuesday Shares:
June 11 - October 22

November Share:
Two Tuesday Pickups
November 5 &
November 19

Bulk Order:
TBA - November 12 or 14

December  Share:
TBA - Usually one pickup the first week in December


Contacts

Main Number & Voice Mail:
877-FDC-FARM (877-332-3276)

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1146, Marblehead, MA 01945

Website: www.farmdirectcoop.org

General: info@farmdirectcoop.org

Operations Manager:

Julie Pottier-Brown
julie@farmdirectcoop.org
877.332.3276, ext. 11

Admin and Finance Manager:
Tamara Sullivan
tamara@farmdirectcoop.org
877.332.3276, ext.13

Newsletter:
Anita Deeley
newsletter@farmdirectcoop.org


Hours

Salem Depot
Hours: 3:30 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Address: Leslie’s Retreat Walkway
Coordinator: Michele Delfino michele.salem@farmdirectcoop.org

877.332.3276, ext. 18

Marblehead Depot
Hours: 3 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Address: Stramski Way

Coordinator: Sarah Fox
sarah.marblehead@farmdirectcoop.org

877.332.3276ext. 12
 
Melrose Depot
Hours: 4 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Address: The Knoll (across from Melrose Middle School, Lynn Fells Parkway) Parking Space #341

Coordinator: Michele Burke
michele.melrose@farmdirectcoop.org

877.332.3276, ext. 17

Photo by Michael Wade, Melrose Depot

FDC FRESH IDEAS


By Julie Pottier-Brown, Operations Manager


This is likely the final week of peaches and tomatoes as summer crops go out and fall crops start to come in. This week we have squash for all! We ordered more of those beautiful red Italia peppers from Piccadilly Farm in Winchester NH. We may have a few extra - so ask your depot coordinator if you are interested in purchasing some. Peppers are one of the "dirty dozen" list of crops from the environmental working group, therefore a good one to eat organically. David Chamutka in Haydenville asked us to buy out his tomatillo crop and offered us a good price to do so.

David supplied the last few cucumbers to be had in the Pioneer Valley which went into the mixed salad at our 20th Anniversary Celebration Harvest Dinner this past Sunday. I had a lot of fun sourcing all the food - except for incidentals like crackers and olive oil - all of the produce, meats, cheese, fruit and beer were locally sourced.  How cool was it to eat a peach pie with the same peaches we got in our share last week, and to see the same baby greens that were at the depot. Farm to table meals have been popular over the last few years and I am glad we were able to create one.  This is a skill set we have, so hopefully we can repeat this in the future.

This is the 15th week of the "regular" season. Five more pick ups to go, the final pick up day is October 22nd.  Though daylight savings time will not switch back until November 3rd, we are going to start losing daylight quickly by the end of the depot day.  We will not adjust the hours, we will be open, but the coordinators will start to break the depot down around 6:30.  You may want to plan your arrival at the depot to be a bit earlier as the days shorten. Flashlights may be necessary to see the boards, and because it is hard to work in the dark, please be willing to help your coordinator close down or make final deliveries if she asks.



Foam Recycling Event On September 21st

Lifoam is holding a foam recycling event from 9-1 on September 21st.  Bring your clean EPS foam to 2 Fifth Street, Peabody, MA.  Lifoam is only able to accept foam during their recycling events.  Please do not ask to drop items off ahead of the event or send foam through the mail.  Also, please do not bring packing peanuts.  For more information about this collection, please contact Oscar at 978-278-6215. There is no residency requirement for this event.


Photo by aopsan at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

For The Love Of Bees And Honey

By Michele Delfino, Salem Depot
Anita Deeley - FDC Newsletter Editor and Beekeeper
As the Salem Depot Coordinator, I have really enjoyed meeting so many new and interesting people. One of the members I enjoyed getting to know is fellow FDC employee and beekeeper, Anita Deeley. One afternoon in Salem, member Mary Ann Pirrotta mentioned there were some wild bees in her yard, and I told her about Anita. Then Anita showed up,  they went to investigate together and Anita ended up with the hive and the member didn’t have to hire an exterminator. Such a happy ending for all!
 
Anita is shy, so I took it upon myself to make her answer questions about her history with bees. A professional beekeeper, her interest in bees started with a visit to the bee building at the Topsfield Fair. The bee building is a great stop at the fair, lots of crafts for kids, and beeswax candle making. Anita says:
 
“While rolling a beeswax candle at the candle rolling table at the fair, I started to ask the woman helping me a lot of questions about bees. I had so many questions she suggested I sign up for the Essex County Beekeeper's beekeeping class, so I did. I never intended to keep bees, I only wanted to learn about them, but after taking the class I got my first hive of bees and was stung by the beekeeping bug so to speak.”
 
Now Anita has about 50 hives, is a professional beekeeper and the Essex County Bee Inspector. Anita is also a canner, and jam-maker, and I asked her about her favorite honey recipe and her reply was: “Honey is good in everything, it is so hard to pick. But I like it best straight from the hive.” It’s probably best to stick with the honey in everything idea though, unless you’re a professional.
 
Anita Deeley sells her honey at the Beverly Farmer's Market once a month and also takes orders via email at beverlybees@gmail.com. You can also learn more about her at her website www.beverlybees.com.
.
Jars of Anita's Treatment Free Honey

Some Interesting Facts About Bees from Anita’s website:

  • It takes 12 bees their entire lifetime to make just one teaspoon of honey.
  • Honey bees visit 2 million flowers to make one pound of honey
  • Field bees visit 50 to 100 flowers during each trip.
  • Honey bees fly 12 and 15 miles per hour.
  • Honey bees flap their wings 12,000 times per minute.
  • Honey is essentially dehydrated nectar from flowers. Bees eat honey and pollen from flowers. They ferment the pollen first and mix it with honey in order to be able to digest it
It's Fall! Get Ready for the Root Vegetables



By JoyEllen Snellgrove, Melrose Member
 
When the weather gets colder, I get excited. It's time to roast the mixed root vegetables and enjoy a staple for the entire wintertime.
 
Why this simple dish is the best vegetable dish in the world? 
 
1. It's easy. Very easy!
2. It's a mix of veggies. You can adjust it for your favorites, or just for what you have on hand. 
3. Roasting caramelizes the starch in root vegetables, lending a sweetness to the dish without adding sweeteners.
4. Even with endless variation, the dish almost always comes out very well balanced. The more assertive vegetables mellow out when combined with more neutral tasting vegetables like potatoes. The milder vegetables pick up interest from the contrasting flavors.
5. The leftovers will keep in the fridge for a week or two, and you won't get tired of them. I promise!
 
I got my recipe from Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything, but it's flexible and I've seen many variations:
 
Roasted Root Vegetables
 
  • About 3 lbs root veggies. Try to include an onion unless you hate them. Other good ideas - low starch potatoes, carrots, celeriac, parsnips, turnips, rutebaga, sweet potatoes.
  • 2 tablespoons butter and 2 tablespoons olive oil - or use all olive oil if you wish
  • Salt and pepper to taste.
  • Dried or fresh thyme (optional) or other spices you fancy.
 
Preheat oven to 415.
 
Put the butter and oil in a 12 inch oven-safe pan over very low heat. Let the butter melt while you chop veggies.
 
Peel the vegetables if you want. Chop them roughly into 1/2 in-1 in pieces.
 
Put them into the pan and stir to coat with the oil/butter mixture. Add salt, pepper and thyme if using. Put the pan into the oven.
 
Open the oven and shake the pan about every 15 minutes. Cook until the veggies are soft and slightly browned.
 
What to do with the leftovers?
 
Reheat and serve as a side with fish or meat. 
Drizzle them with reduced balsamic vinegar.
Warm them and toss with a vinagrette and some greens for a warm salad.
Mash them up loosely and re-fry for a root vegetable hash.
Make a fritatta. 
Make a gratin.
 
The list goes on! 

Photo by Boaz Yiftach at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.
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