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Jerry Friedman on the myth of animal flesh as a causative factor in human brain evolution

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Speciesist Science: Animal Flesh & Human Brain Evolution: Dispelling Myths

Jerry Friedman shares his ideas with the Friends of Eden in this issue of Somebodies, Not Somethings.
 

We live in a speciesist society that hangs on the cultural myth of human superiority rather than the fact of animal sentience.  Sadly, science frequently fails to call attention to the myths and flaws that become commonly accepted as fact, and that, in turn, perpetuates our rationale for exploiting other animals.

Myths and flaws in the scientific literature point to the very serious issue of speciesism in scientific research.   One of the scientific myths that is culturally unquestioned and that is used to justify human omnivorism, and our failure to even begin to think about animal equality at a societal level, is the notion that eating meat caused the human brain to evolve, somehow endowing the flesh of other animals with the capacity to confer intellectual benefits onto a single group of primates:  humans.  It is a myth that Jerry Friedman, American Lawyer and Animal Rights Activist, is thoroughly dismantling.  Here he shares some of his ideas with the Friends of Eden in this issue of Somebodies, Not Somethings.  
You can read the full interview here
 

The brains of bonobos and chimpanzees are the same size despite the fact that chimpanzees hunt and eat meat but bonobos do not. If eating meat caused encephalization and evolutionary forces act equally, then chimpanzees should have a larger brain than bonobos. Hence something else causes brain growth.

The spider monkey brain doubled in size while eating fruit, being active and social, and possibly exercising their memory.

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