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 February 13, 2018
A worried woman speaks with her husband

Seam

In the not-too-distant future, a tenuous peace between humans and remarkably humanlike “machines” (who don’t even know they’re not real) is tested when synthetics begin spontaneously exploding. 

An Arab woman tries to find her way to safety in the aftermath of the human-machine war. They need to get to the Machine Homeland, deep within the Arabian desert, before its too late. She slowly discovers who (and what) she is, with the help of her soldier husband.

A film by by Rajeev Dassani and Elan Dassani.

Watch the Film
 
reverse color image of Kwame Nkrumah

Did Nkrumah Sell His Soul?

A story by Kobby Ankomah-Graham.

"I once met a taxi driver who explained Ghana’s developmental woes to me in simple spiritual terms. The way he told it, to perform a feat as epic as black independence from a hundred years of white rule, Kwame Nkrumah obviously cut a deal with a spirit: A blood oath.

Citing biblical chapter and verse, the driver broke down how blood oaths are like loans except instead of borrowing money, you borrow power. As with a loan, you must put down a deposit: the more the deposit, the more power you receive. Nkrumah needed a lot of power to pull off the miracle of African independence.

So he pledged to the spirit the souls of all of Ghana’s unborn children.

The risk must have seemed small: Nkrumah believed in his plans for our fledgeling nation. He would have little trouble securing whatever was needed to alleviate the debt. Unfortunately for us all – the driver explained – Nkrumah was exiled and died before he could repay whatever debt he owed.

And so our nation is destined to forever be stuck in developmental purgatory until we discover what the debt is, the spirit to whom it is owed, and settle it."

Wow.

Read More →
 
thinking of a VR connected plant

The Jungle

A short film by Joseph Melhuish about a vacation in virtual reality. Created for the Paradise episode of Off the Air.

This short makes you wonder just what VR will eventually become. With all the possible sources of content and context, will we ever be able to jack into other forms of life, to experience their reality?

Watch the Short →
 
woman waters plants in a futuristic indoor garden

It's watering day

Work by Emmanuel Edeko, a nineteen year-old Nigerian artist. So much of the science-fiction illustration we see is focused on grand scale, but this one is just a botanist's chill moment in her lab. The watering bot behind her sits quietly, waiting for further instructions. This is more of the future I want us to create.

See more of his work on Instagram →
 

Thanks for reading!

Senongo
 
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