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O Canada September 2016, Issue 16
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O CANADA
The newsletter of Orienteering Canada
September 2016, Issue 16

I N   T H I S   I S S U E

Controller's Notes
Update from Orienteering Canada
Coach Communiqué
Upcoming Events 
NAOC Recap
Taking Initiatives in Our Communities
What it feels like to be on the WOC podium
Around the Refreshment Table
From the Archives
 

Controller's Notes

FROM THE EDITOR

Thanks to all who submitted content and content ideas for this newsletter. Send your articles, pictures and ideas to Katie at newsletter@orienteering.ca by the submission deadlines listed below. The newsletter will be published within a few weeks after these dates. Submission deadlines: October 15, November 10

Update from Orienteering Canada

THE LATEST NEWS FROM THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND COMMITTEES



NAOCs
It was great to see so many Canadian orienteers at the recent North American Championships. A hearty thanks to the organizers and we are looking forward to the next North Amercian Championships in the Yukon in 2018!

2017 Planning
As the season winds down and your club/association starts to think about the 2017 season, here are a few things we would like you to consider in your scheduling:
  • National Orienteering Week is May 20-28, 2017 & World Orienteering Day is May 24. Please schedule at least one beginner friendly orienteering event during that time.
  • Coaching and officials clinics: Will you add a coaching and officials clinic to your schedule? Contact tracy@orienteering.ca for more info on hosting a clinic. 

COCs 2017
Mark July 29 to August 7, 2017 on your calendar for next year's COCs and accompanying O-Fest, hosted by Orienteering Ottawa in partnership with Montreal Ramblers.  More details in the next newsletter!

1967-2017: Orienteering Canada turns 50
As Canada reaches it's 150th birthday in 2017, Orienteering Canada celebrates being 50 years old in 2017! Do you have great ideas about how we can celebrate?

Please share them with us at OC50th@orienteering.ca

Committee Membership
We are looking to fill a few positions on some of our committees.

Orienteering Canada is always interested in hearing from anyone interested in getting involved on a committee or in other ways. PLEASE contact us if you might be interested in getting involved - it's a great way to get to know more people, to learn about our sport from a different angle, to bring some new knowledge back to your own orienteering or to your club. Contact Anne Teutsch at president@orienteering.ca or Tracy Bradley at tracy@orienteering.ca to have your arm twisted!

Sport Matters Lobby Day

Charlotte MacNaughton and Anne Teutsch will be attending Lobby Day on Parliament Hill on Tuesday, October 18. Leaders from across the sport and recreation sector meet with Members of Parliament to talk about the importance of sport. Lobby Day is coordinated by Sport Matters 

Coach Communiqué

THE LATEST NEWS FROM OUR COACHES



Hi coaches!

Just a few notes to bring you up to date on the status of the National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP)

We are rolling out the Competition-Introduction Program this fall after two successful pilot workshops over the last 12 months. The Coaching Association of Canada (CAC) is satisfied with the quality of our Comp-Intro agenda and we are only waiting for the translation of the workshop material to be completed before we receive Final Approval.

In the meantime, we have been encouraging coaches to attend the Multi-Sport workshops offered by the CAC through the Provincial/Territorial Associations. At the COC’s in Canmore, several coaches attended the Teaching and Learning workshop delivered by Shelley Fried of Sport Alberta. There are two other Multi-Sport workshops that are part of Orienteering’s Comp-Intro certification curriculum: Make Ethical Decisions and Planning a Practice.

For more information on our Coach Certification programs and where the courses are offered please visit our Get Coaching website here!

We are in the process of scheduling the Comp-Intro orienteering-specific workshop (Analyze Performance) this fall. We will also be training more Facilitators to help us deliver the program. More information about where and when these workshops will take place will be posted on the O-Canada and provincial web sites. The Community Coach program is still very active and we are looking forward to offering more workshops in the near future. We now have about 120 trained Community Coaches across the country.

Finally, I would like to welcome Brent Langbakk to the Coaching Committee. He is one of the most experienced HPP coaches in Canada and will be a great help in the delivery of the Comp- Intro program. Committee stalwarts Magali Robert, Francis Kawam, Linda Hildebrandt, and Jim Blanchard are all “hanging in” for at least another year. Thank you for all your support.

Cheers, Bill Anderson

Upcoming Events


October 1st and 2nd: Quebec Orienteering Championships (Canada Cup)

Be sure to check out the National Event Database for many fall orienteering events happening across the country!

North American Orienteering Champs Recap

TAKING A LOOK AT THE 2016 NAOCs



The 2016 NAOCs in New Hampshire got rave reviews for the challenging and beautiful terrain at the following locations: 

Middle :Storrs Pond 
Long: Burnt Mountain
Sprint: Dartmouth Campus

Relay: Dartmouth Campus 


A whole slew of Canadians found success at the 2016 NAOCs! Runners of all ages navigated their way through the New Hampshire terrain and brought home medals galore. Below is the complete list of North American Champs, congratulations to all!

Sprint Distance
F-10 – Lia Fransson – Dontgetlost
F-12 – Skyleigh Dorsey – Dontgetlost
F-21 – Emily Kemp – OOC
F-55 – Joanne Woods – GVOC
F-60 – Marion Owen – FWOC
F-65 – Christin Lundgren – FWOC
F-80 – Gillian Bailey – VICO
F-85 – Gloria Charlow – Ramblers
M-12 – Lukas Raz – OOC
M-14 – Evan Raz – OOC
M-18 – Noah Michelsen – Dontgetlost
M-21 – Damian Konotopetz – Coureurs de Bois
M-45 – Mike Waddington – Dontgetlost
M-60 – Afan Jones – YOA
M-70 – Greg Yarkie – EOOC
M-80 – Leigh Bailey – VICO
M-85 – John Charlow – Ramblers

Long Distance

F-10 – Lia Fransson – DontGetLost
F-12 – Robyn Astridge – FWOC
F-16 – Sianna Dorsey – DontGetLost
F-21 – Emily Kemp – OOC
F-70 – Marg Ellis – GVOC
F-80 – Gillian Bailey – VICO
F-85 – Gloria Charlow – Ramblers
M-12 – Lukas Raz – OOC
M-14 – Anton Mlynczyk – UKR
M-16 – Evan Gibbard – OOC
M-18 – Noah Michelsen – DontGetLost
M-40 – Hans Fransson – DontGetLost
M-45 – Mike Waddington – DontGetLost
M-55 – Ross Burnett – YOA
M-60 – Afan Jones – YOA
M-70 – Brian Ellis – GVOC
M-80 – Leigh Bailey – VICO

Middle Distance

F-10 – Veronica Kopanicak – DontGetLost
F-12 – Robyn Astridge – FWOC
F-16 – Sianna Dorsey – DontGetLost
F-21 – Emily Kemp – OOC
F-35 – Nadine Cybulski – Ramblers
F-55 – Joanne Woods – GVOC
F-70 – Marg Ellis – GVOC
F-80 – Nesta Leduc – YOA
F-85 – Gloria Charlow – Ramblers
M-12 – Lukas Raz – OOC
M-14 – Evan Raz – OOC
M-16 – Evan Gibbard – OOC
M-18 – Noah Michelsen – DontGetLost
M-20 – Robbie Graham – OOC
M-21 – Damian Konotopetz – MOA
M-40 – Hans Fransson – DontGetLost
M-60 – Afan Jones – YOA
M-80 – Leigh Bailey – VICO
  
Photos by Dave Yee

At the elite level, Canada found victory at the North American Orienteering Championships (NAOC), thanks to three individual wins for Emily Kemp and two for Damian Konotopetz. Emily won all three individual distance competitions, Middle, Long and Sprint and helped the Canadian team to sprint relay victory in a close race with the USA. Louise Oram was right on her heels with a second place finish in the Middle and the Long.  Damian won North American Champion titles in both Middle and Sprint among the men, and added a bronze in the Long distance.

As for the juniors, Noah Michelsen made a clean sweep of the M18 titles and Robert Graham won the M20 Middle distance gold.

A special congratulations goes to Emily (Long and Middle) and Damian (Middle) as these results mean that Emily and Damian have gained personal starting places in the respective competitions at WOC 2017 in Estonia! 
 

Canada also won the Björn Kjellström (BK) Cup. Named after a Swede who was instrumental in introducing orienteering in North America, the BK cup was first awarded in 1980 and is a competition between the national teams of the USA and Canada at the senior level.

Taking Initiative in our Communities

A CHAT WITH NOVA SCOTIA'S KARA TURNER



I sat down (virtually, anyway!) with one of Orienteering Canada's ambitious members, Kara Turner, to chat about how she is introducing Orienteering to her area of Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia. Check out what she had to say in the interview!
-Katie

- - - - - -
Hi Kara, thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts with the Canadian Orienteering community! I hear you used to be a member of the British Junior national team?
 
Kara: Yes! I grew up in Cornwall, England and started out with the South-west Junior Squad and then joined the British Junior Squad for a couple of years in the late 1980s. I was part of their Halden training camp in Norway in 1987.
 
That's really awesome. With all that experience, what is your favourite type of terrain to run on?
 
Kara: Anything scenic gets my vote — I love runnable forest best. Preferably forests without bears and cougars! We lived in Calgary for 10 years, and I was terrified when we first started orienteering in Alberta. (I ran into a bison once, but I never met a bear while orienteering.)
 
I'm from Calgary, so I can relate to that! For those who have never been to Mahone Bay, can you describe the terrain nearby?
 
Kara: Mahone Bay is a small seaside town of 900 people on the south shore of Nova Scotia. It’s a periglacial landscape with the classic Nova Scotia drumlins and is densely forested. We have some of the most beautiful old-growth forests with a good path network within town limits that would make a wonderful orienteering map. Tourism is the primary industry in town (we’re famous for our iconic Three Churches along the water), but I’d love to see more of the tourists get out into the woods and along our old rail trail network!
 
Can you tell us a little bit about how you are introducing Orienteering in Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia?
 
Kara: I was thrilled to find out that the local P-9 school has its own orienteering map. It’s a little out of date but still useable so with some Community Health Board funding I set up a permanent course in the school grounds for the Phys Ed teachers to use during school hours, and we launched it on World Orienteering Day in May. I’ve also taught basic orienteering skills to the Trailblazers after-school group, set up a mountain bike orienteering course for the local bike summer camp along the Rum Runners Trail, run a community event in Mahone Bay in partnership with the Bay to Bay Trail on National Trail Day, run a basic skills course through the local municipal recreation department, and with the help of a friend run an orienteering adventure course for a 4H leadership group. But the most innovative thing I did this summer was an indoor orienteering event at the Lunenburg County Lifestyle Centre in Bridgewater. It was a wet August day so I had the kids colour in a floor plan “map” of the recreation centre: blue for the swimming pools, green for the forest of books in the library, and yellow for the “open” ice rink, then set out a course of 10 controls around the inside of the building. It worked a treat!
 
 

Way to be creative! Sounds like you have been busy. What has been your most successful method in introducing Orienteering to Mahone Bay?
 
Kara: I’ve tried a little bit of everything so far. It’s still in the early days. I started a Facebook page called South Shore Orienteers to try and spread the word and to share information on local events, but it’s very small scale. I’ve had good response from articles in the local papers. My most successful events have been ones with a captive audience: the summer camp and 4H groups.
 
Have you faced any challenges trying to introduce the sport?
 
Kara: Orienteering is still very much a fringe sport here despite our almost perfect terrain. The existing orienteering maps need updating and I’d really love a map of Mahone Bay’s trail network! (I’ve resorted to openstreetmap.org for the mountain bike courses.) Our population base is very small so an event with 25 people is considered a decent event, and to get 25 people still requires considerable marketing effort (and I don’t have any ongoing funding). And then there are the usual time constraints: I’m a busy working mum with a young family.
 
25 is still great! Has there been much community reaction, and if so, how?
 
Kara: I’ve been featured in the local papers a few times and was invited to give a talk on orienteering at the Community Health Board AGM (as a result I’m now on the board!). But it’s an uphill struggle to keep orienteering on the community radar. Other orienteers in Nova Scotia have been supportive — especially Jim Blanchard who came down to walk the trails of Mahone Bay with me and give me course planning advice, and Pam James who showed up to my first community event and even collected some of the controls for me.

What was your motivation behind introducing the sport to the area?
 
Kara: I have three children aged 6, 8 and 12 — around the age that I was when I started orienteering. The sport played a huge part in my childhood and I really want them to be able to enjoy it, too. But broader than that, I want all the local children to get a chance to try it — I’d love to see a Nova Scotian on the Canadian Junior Team one day!

Last question: what do you think makes Orienteering unique and/or special?
 
Kara: It’s the perfect sport: a combination of mental and physical skill that takes you to the most beautiful parts of the world! I love discovering new places, being outside, keeping fit, and testing my decision-making skills. The fact that it’s a race adds the final frisson of excitement. This combination of elements makes it hard to explain to newcomers, so I sometimes tell them “Just give it a try! You’ll love it!”

Kara, I couldn't agree more. Thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts, and keep up the great work of sharing Orienteering!


If you know someone who would like to share their Orienteering thoughts or initiatives with us, e-mail newsletter@orienteering.ca

What it Feels like to be on the WOC Podium

A NOTE FROM EMILY KEMP


As you all likely know by now, Emily Kemp has made Canada proud once again this summer at the World Orienteering Championships. But what does it really feel like to be on the podium? What does years of training cumulating into one race really feel like? See what Emily had to say about it all over on The Team Canada Blog

 

Photo by Moa Gustafsson

Around the Refreshment Table

EXCITING NEWS FROM OUR ORIENTEERING CANADA MEMBERS


Louise Oram and Thomas Nipen were married on September 17th, after meeting in Canada through Orienteering, and subsequently moving back to Thomas's home country of Norway. Although Thomas is technically Norwegian, we will always consider Thomas one of our own, as he has been an important part of the Orienteering Canada community for many years, as has Louise. We couldn't be happier for Thomas and Louise and wish them many years of happiness.

From The Archives

LOOKING BACK INTO THE ORIENTEERING CANADA ARCHIVES


As the 2016 NAOC's have come to a close, we're taking a peek into 1982, as the winners of the NAOC racers gathered for a photo op in Carberry, Manitoba. As Winnie Krogsrud wrote in the 1982 newsletter,  these events allowed competitors to "glean a little prairie wisdom".  As it turns out, they also gained some fame- 34 years later, in their very own newsletter feature.
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