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Salon: Issue 401
20 February 2018

Next issue: 6 March


The Society of Antiquaries of London Online Newsletter (Salon) is a fortnightly digest of heritage news. It focuses on the activities of the Society and the contributions that the Society's Fellows make to public life. A copy of Salon’s editorial policy can be found on the Society’s website.

Please send news, comment and feedback for publication to the Editor, Mike Pitts, at Salon EditorSalon does not review books, but the Editor is pleased to receive details and front cover images of new titles written by Fellows. Scholarly publications are reviewed in The Antiquaries Journal: for details see Publications.

Fellows may occasionally find they do not receive email notification of a new Salon. There are suggestions for solving this here, but failing all else there is an online archive where new editions go live at the same time as the mailing. Every Salon lists the publication date of the next edition at the top.
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Inside this issue

From the Desk of the General Secretary

Heritage Lottery Fund strategy consultation


A consultation on the HLF Strategy 2019-2024 has now been launched, and closes on 22nd March. You can find a link to the document which details the questions – in English (there is also a version in Welsh), here. The consultation is being run by ComRes, an independent research consultancy.

The Society will be making a response, co-ordinated by the Policy Committee, and any reader of SALON who wishes the Society to consider making specific points in reply to this rather extensive questionnaire, is asked to send their suggestions in to John Lewis (jlewis@sal.org.uk) by 15 March at the latest.
 

The Heritage of Minority Faith Buildings in the 20th Century


Can you join us for our next conference, taking place on 12 March? Co-hosted with Historic England and organised by Dr Linda Monckton FSA, this event will bring together a new body of research on Islamic, Hindu, Buddhist, Sikh, Jain and Zoroastrian places of worship. The aim is to provide a platform for a discussion on issues of heritage practice and heritage discourse in the field of multiculturalism, multiple identities and the historic environment—focusing on faith groups which arrived in the UK in the late 19th and 20th century.

Find out more >

From the Governance Officer


Online Balloting is now open

To vote online in our four upcoming Ballots, please login to the Fellows’ Area and go to the Ballots section. From here, you can read Blue Papers and cast your vote for all candidates.

Simply click on the ‘Details’ option to the right of a candidates’ name, and you will automatically be taken to the voting page.

Cast your votes >

Please note, online balloting closes at noon on the day of the vote. The next vote is taking place on Thursday 1 March but you may vote online at any time until noon on the day of the ballot.

Outstanding Photo Album by British Pioneer May Leave UK




Arts Minister Michael Ellis has placed a temporary export bar on Mrs Cameron’s Photographs from the Life by Julia Margaret Cameron (1815–79). The extraordinary collection (known as the Norman Album) will leave Britain if a buyer cannot be found to match the asking price of £3,700,000 by 5 May (extendable until 5 September if a serious intention is made to raise funds to buy).
 
A leading pioneer photographer, between 1864 and 1869 Cameron assembled albums for her family, friends and close acquaintances, tailoring them to suit recipients. Ten are known to have survived, This one was made for her daughter Julia and son-in-law, Charles Norman, in September 1869. Its 75 prints include some of her most iconic portraits, depicting among others her niece Julia Jackson (mother of Virginia Woolf), John Herschel, Alfred Tennyson and Charles Darwin. ‘He says’, wrote Cameron across the bottom of Darwin’s mount (above right), “he likes this photograph better than any other that has been taken of him”.
 
Lowell Libson FSA, a member of the Reviewing Committee, said in a release that during her brief career of twelve years as a photographer, Julia Margaret Cameron was ‘criticized for her unconventional techniques as well as lauded for the beauty of her images. She wished “to ennoble Photography and to secure for it the character and uses of High Art by combining the real and the Ideal and sacrificing nothing of the Truth by all possible devotion to poetry and beauty.”
 
‘This magnificent album’ he adds, ‘contains exceptionally beautiful prints of many of Cameron’s most famous and important images. [It] undoubtedly both heralds and commemorates the dawn of serious portraiture through the medium of the lens.’
 

Britain's First Hunter-gatherer Genomes Sequenced


This is the face of Cheddar Man, a modern human buried in a cave near the Somerset village 10,000 years ago, as reconstructed by Dutch brothers Alfons and Adrie Kennis. The model comes from the most recent of a series of projects led by Chris Stringer FSA at the Natural History Museum, in which scientists have been analysing late glacial remains from Cheddar Gorge recovered since the 19th century, including some from new excavation. Cheddar Man, a very rare near complete skeleton of its age, was found in Gough’s Cave in 1903.
 
The shape of the head and facial details were determined by features of the skull, but skin (dark or dark to black), hair (dark brown possibly black) and eye colour (blue/green) were suggested by elements of the man’s DNA. His whole genome has been sequenced, from a small amount of bone taken from the skull. It was read by Ian Barnes and Selina Brace at the Natural History Museum (NHM), and analysed by Mark Thomas and Yoan Diekmann at UCL Genetics, Evolution and Environment.
 
This is the first time the colour of Cheddar Man’s skin has been shown to be dark. Public interest was strong, helped by promotion for a Channel 4 film broadcast on 18 February (First Brit: Secrets of the 10,000 Year Old Man). That people in Britain at this time were likely to have been dark-skinned, however, had already been known by scientists.
 
Cheddar Man’s genetic profile, said Thomas in a release, ‘places him with several other Mesolithic-era Europeans from Spain, Hungary and Luxembourg whose DNA has already been analysed. These “Western hunter-gatherers” [WHG] migrated into Europe at the end of the last ice age, and the group included Cheddar Man’s ancestors’.
 
Ancient DNA analysis is increasingly showing the history of modern Europeans to have involved several significant genetic changes resulting from migrations and mixing. There are remains of more ancient humans from Gough’s Cave, from whom Cheddar Man was not directly descended, and only around 10% of modern indigenous British ancestry can be linked to the 10,000-year-old skeleton.
 
The research paper was put online ahead of peer review on 19 February, titled ‘Population replacement in Early Neolithic Britain.’ Authors include Alison Sheridan FSA, Mike Parker Pearson FSA and Chris Stringer. Cheddar Man’s genome represents one of six Mesolithic British individuals, and along with that of 16 new Neolithic and 51 previously published Neolithic British individuals, is used to characterise the Mesolithic and Neolithic populations of Britain. The scientists conclude that the transition to farming at the start of the Neolithic 6,000 years ago was accompanied by incoming continental farmers.
 
A study released last year also in preliminary form claimed that around 4500 years ago, the time Stonehenge was built, the then indigenous UK genome was all but displaced by migrants from the Continent who made Beaker-style pottery (see Pots on the March, Salon 388). The 10% of WHG DNA seen in modern white Britons could be derived from these Beaker people. They would have picked it up from intermixing with Neolithic Continental populations with a proportion of WHG in their genome.
 
Stringer, Research Leader in Human Origins at the NHM, first excavated at Gough’s Cave 30 years ago. He said in a release, ‘I first studied Cheddar Man more than 40 years ago, but could never have believed that we would one day have his whole genome – the oldest British one to date!

Exploring the Mystery of the Pink Lobster




The Paston Treasure (c 1663), an important and remarkable depiction of a schatzkammer (cabinet of treasures) was commissioned by either Sir William Paston, first Baronet (1610–63), or his son Robert Paston, first Earl of Yarmouth (1631–83). The identity of the Dutch itinerant artist working at Oxnead Hall, Norfolk, remains unresolved. The painting itself, combining still life, portraiture, animal painting and allegory, defies categorisation, and some of its colours look unreal.
 
These enigmas are explored in The Paston Treasure: Microcosm of the Known World, an exhibition at the Yale Center for British Art (until 27 May) which later comes to Norwich Castle Museum and Art Gallery (23 June–23 September). The painting is normally displayed in Norwich, and the Society of Antiquaries has lent the series of royal portraits that usually hang in the Meeting Room – they once belonged to the Paston family and subsequently the antiquary Thomas Kerrich FSA (1748–1828).
 
The display includes nearly 140 objects from more than 50 international institutional and private lenders. There are five treasures that actually appear in the painting, gathered together for the first time in more than three centuries: a silver-gilt flagon, a Strombus shell cup, two nautilus cups and a perfume flask with a mother-of-pearl body.
 
Andrew Moore FSA (former Keeper of Art and Senior Curator, Norwich) is Guest Curator of the show, and co-editor of the accompanying publication with Nathan Flis (Yale) and Francesca Vanke FSA (Norwich); over 40 contributors include several Fellows. The curatorial team at Yale has been assisted by Jessica David, Elisabeth Fairman FSA and Sarah Welcome.

Stephen Fry narrates a short film for Yale about the painting, introducing new technical analyses. Lynn Roberts FSA wrote about the painting and the regilding of its frame in 2015 on The Frame Blog.

 

Fellows (and Friends)

 
Robert McC Adams FSA, archaeologist, died in January.
 
Michael Green FSA, Inspector of Ancient Monuments, died in January.
 
Elizabeth Hartley FSA, museum archaeologist, died in January.
 
Ray Sutcliffe FSA, film producer, died in February.
 
Appreciations appear in Fellows Remembered below. The section also contains a further notice on the late Gavin Stamp FSA.

*

Jackie Keily, Senior Curator, Prehistory and Roman at the Museum of London (MOL), writes to say that the exhibition Tunnel: The Archaeology of Crossrail, which she curated at the Museum of London Docklands last year, has won the Royal Historical Society’s Museums and Exhibitions prize for 2018. The award is a category in the RHS’s Public History Prize, and was presented by Samir Shah, Chief Executive and Creative Director of Juniper TV and Chair of the Geffrye Museum. Judges felt the exhibition ‘demonstrated how large infrastructure projects can make an impact on the public understanding of the past, and appeal to all ages. It represents the summation of the Elizabeth Line, and was a free exhibition of some 500 artefacts: a rich, vivid display of a deep and diverse urban history.’ The photo shows members of the project team (including representatives from MOL, Crossrail and Museum of London Archaeology) with the award on 26 January.

Creativity in the Bronze Age: Understanding Innovation in Pottery, Textile, and Metalwork Production is edited and largely written by Lise Bender Jørgensen, Joanna Sofaer FSA and Marie Louise Stig Sørensen FSA. The book arises from the Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA)-funded project, Creativity and Craft Production in Middle and Late Bronze Age Europe, which brought together colleagues from England, Norway, Denmark, Austria and Croatia. Creativity is an integral part of human history, says the blurb, yet most studies focus on the modern era. This book explores the fundamental nature of creativity in the European Bronze Age. It compares and contrasts the development of crafts we take for granted today, from construction of the materials, through production processes, to design and effects deployed in finished objects. It explores how creativity is closely related to changes in material culture, how it directs responses to the new and unfamiliar, and how it has resulted in changes to familiar things and practices.

The Wallace Collection is celebrating 200 years since the birth of its founder, Sir Richard Wallace. On 13 February it announced that new exhibition space will open on 19 June. The Collection had secured £1.2 million to develop expanded exhibition galleries, tripling the capacity of the museum’s existing exhibition space and setting the scene for an ambitious programme of temporary exhibitions. The inaugural exhibition, Sir Richard Wallace: The Collector, celebrates him as a great philanthropist and undiscovered cultural luminary. The curatorial team includes Tobias Capwell FSA (Arms and Armour), Suzanne Higgott FSA (Glass, Limoges Painted Enamels, Earthenwares and early Furniture) and Jeremy Warren FSA (Emeritus Research Fellow). Higgott has organised a series of History of Collecting Seminars focusing on London and Paris in the later 19th century – see listings in Other Forthcoming Events below.

CIfA (the Chartered Institute of Archaeologists) has launched CIfA Deutschland. Formal elections will take place at its first AGM in Munich on 12 May 2018. Michaela Schauer, CIfA Deutschland’s interim Chair, said in a release, ‘German archaeologists have worked very hard to get to this point. All German archaeologists who want to be part of this project can plan how CIfA can help promote professionalism in archaeology, and show that German archaeologists add value to industry and to society. We are committed to promoting good practice and sharing knowledge. And we are keen to help our colleagues become accredited by CIfA and so demonstrate their skills in the study and care of the historic environment.’

Wessex Archaeology has found a Neolithic causewayed enclosure, a central place earthwork of regional significance dated to 3500 BC, at Riding Court near Datchet, Berkshire. The single circuit of ditch segments was uncovered during monitoring of quarrying by CEMEX UK. Finds include flint arrowheads, knives and serrated blades, and decorated pottery. Jacqueline McKinley FSA told Dalya Alberge, writing for the Guardian (8 February) that human remains showed evidence of post-mortem manipulation: ‘The skull and left femur had been removed from one individual, and cut marks are visible on a skull that had been deliberately placed on the bottom of the ditch.’ ‘This is such an exciting and important discovery in the royal borough [of Windsor],' said Roland Smith FSA. Archaeologists hope future work as quarrying progresses will allow them to excavate and study the site’s surrounding landscape. • This is the second significant causewayed enclosure to be found by Wessex Archaeology in recent months. Another was discovered in excavations ahead of a major Army housing project at Larkhill Garrison, just north of the Stonehenge World Heritage Site.
 
In December 2017 Chris Scarre FSA won a Distinguished Service Award at the Shanghai Archaeology Forum for his editorship of Antiquity. Now he has handed the journal over to Robert Witcher FSA, Associate Professor of Archaeology at Durham University, with a new team in the Department of Archaeology at Durham. In his first editorial, in which he also namechecks former editors O G S Crawford FSA, Martin Carver FSA and Chris Chippindale FSA, Witcher notes that under his predecessor Antiquity moved from four to six issues a year, and a new publishing partnership with Cambridge University Press. Dan Lawrence, a Near Eastern landscape archaeologist, is Reviews Editor. Rebecca Gowland, a bioarchaeologist, becomes Antiquity's first Associate Editor, and Liz Ryan succeeds Jo Dean as Editorial Manager.
 
The Culture Secretary has reappointed Jane Kennedy and Sir David Cannadine FSA as Trustees of the Historic Royal Palaces Board for a second term of three years, to 18 May 2021. A Government press release describes Cannadine as ‘a distinguished academic with an international reputation, having written pioneering and influential works of history on many subjects, including on the British monarchy’.

Mary Beard FSA will host the second series of BBC TV’s version of Radio 4's Front Row, an arts review programme; she was one of several presenters in the experimental first series. The job ‘confirms Beard as one of the BBC’s most prominent presenters’ said the Guardian. ‘She will be on screen next month presenting two episodes of Civilisations, regarded as the most important arts programming commission for a generation.’ Her Julius Caesar Revealed was broadcast on BBC 1 on 12 February, and can be seen online until the end of the month.
 
‘LiDAR is revolutionising archaeology the way the Hubble Space Telescope revolutionised astronomy,’ Francisco Estrada-Belli FSA told National Geographic in an exclusive feature published online on 1 February. In a piece headlined ‘Laser scans reveal Maya "Megalopolis" below Guatemalan jungle’, Estrada-Belli and his co-investigators Thomas Garrison (Ithaca College) and Marcello Canuto (like Estrada-Belli, at Tulane University) explained that laser-based imagery obtained by flying over dense forest enabled them effectively to see through the trees, and discover ‘the ruins of more than 60,000 houses, palaces, elevated highways, and other human-made features that have been hidden for centuries under the jungles of northern Guatemala’. ‘Most people had been comfortable with population estimates of around five million,’ said Estrada-Belli, who directs a multi-disciplinary archaeological project at Holmul. ‘With this new data it’s no longer unreasonable to think that there were ten to 15 million people there – including many living in low-lying, swampy areas that many of us had thought uninhabitable.’
 
Simon Jenkins FSA was a guest on Broadcasting House on Radio 4 (18 February). They talked about ‘binary discussion’, when the BBC pitches interviewees against each other to achieve an argumentative but not necessarily informative debate. ‘When the BBC calls you up and says, Would you like to take part in this discussion?’, said Jenkins, ‘and you say, Well I think there’s arguments on both sides, the phone goes down!’
 

Fellows Remembered


Robert McC Adams FSA (Bob) died on 27 January aged 91. He was elected a Fellow of the Society in November 1988. In 2007 colleagues presented him with a book celebrating his thinking (Settlement and Society, edited by Elizabeth C Stone). In spite of the volume’s wide scope, read the blurb, ‘the various intellectual threads pioneered by Adams’ hold it together. ‘These include the use of multiple lines of evidence to attack problems, the use of a comparative approach – including the use of ethnographic analogy – as a means of understanding the development of early states, the importance of the continuum of settlement between city dwellers, farmers, marsh dwellers and pastoralists, and an overall appreciation of cultural ecology.’
 
Adams pioneered archaeological survey in his quest to understand the origins of urbanism and complex societies in southern Mesopotamia and Iran. He began at a time when archaeology meant digging for buildings and artefacts. Introducing Adams’ Heartland of Cities: Surveys of Ancient Settlement and Land Use on the Central Floodplain of the Euphrates (1981), Thorkild Jacobsen wrote, ‘This century has seen great discoveries in the field of ancient Mesopotamian archaeology … With time though the less sensational survey by [Adams] will be seen, it seems safe to predict, to be equal or perhaps even surpass them in fundamental importance.’
 
He was, said Louise Lerner in UChicago News (5 February), ‘an early pioneer of the technique of using aerial photography and satellite images, which he combined with historical and ethnographic data to investigate settlement patterns, irrigation structures and early urbanism. Later in his career Adams was renowned for his lucid observations about the responsibilities of archaeologists – and science itself.’
 
Adams studied for his degrees at the University of Chicago (1947–56), where until 1984 he was variously Professor (and sometime Director) in the Oriental Institute, the Harold H Swift Distinguished Service Professor of Anthropology, Social Sciences Dean, and Provost, before moving to the Smithsonian Institution as Secretary.
 
At the Smithsonian he oversaw the opening of the National Museum of the American Indian (which, said the Smithsonian, he ‘considered … to be his most significant accomplishment’), the National Museum of African Art and the National Postal Museum. He had no fear of controversy. He liked to involve indigenous communities in museum planning, but was criticised for reducing ‘the saga of America’s Western pioneers to little more than victimisation, disillusion and environmental rape.’ An exhibition about the US Constitution included a section on Japanese American internment camps during the Second World War, and he proposed exhibitions featuring homeless people and urban graffiti.
 
He retired in 1994. Meanwhile he taught at John Hopkins University, and later part time at University of California, San Diego. Other books included Land Behind Baghdad: A History of Settlement on the Diyala Plains (1965), The Evolution of Urban Society: Early Mesopotamia and Prehispanic Mexico (1966), and Paths of Fire: An Anthropologist's Inquiry into Western Technology (1996).
 
He received several honorary doctorates, and the Grand Cross of Nuñez de Balboa, Panama. The Society for American Archaeology awarded him its Distinguished Service Medal (1996). ‘Few archaeologists,’ wrote Norman Yoffee in 1997, ‘have had the power to influence the course of their times as has Adams, nor to have done it so well’ (‘Robert McCormick Adams: an archaeological biography’, American Antiquity 62, 399–413).

*

Michael Green FSA (H J M Green) died on 28 January aged 86. Simon Thurley FSA has written this tribute:
 
‘Michael Green was born in St Ives in what was then Huntingdonshire and, while his brother went into the wine trade, Michael was described by his remarkable mother as being “off with the Romans”. He had a lifelong fascination with Roman archaeology, and in particular Godmanchester, already a well-known Roman site by the time Michael, aged only 20, started excavating there in 1951. He had been mentored by the architect and Huntingdonshire antiquarian Sydney Inskip Ladds, and advised by Sir Mortimer Wheeler FSA to find a site he could make his own, and to excavate it thoroughly.
 
‘Michael recognised that the town not only had remarkably well-preserved remains but that its later documentary record was unusually full. Over some 30 seasons he showed that an apparently insignificant road junction was an important small town with baths, basilica, forum, mansio and three successive temples. He practiced community archaeology, though he would never have called it that, enthralling the local population through the 60s, 70s and 80s and involving scores of volunteers. There were many periodical publications, but a comprehensive report has only just been published, as Durovigutum: Roman Godmanchester, edited by Tim Malim FSA. Just before he died, Michael had the satisfaction of holding the page proofs in his hands.
 
‘Archaeology was no way to earn a living and, after National Service in Egypt, Michael, an exceptionally talented draftsman, went into architecture, training at the Regent Street Polytechnic. After a brief stint in private practice he decided to join the Ministry of Works Historic Buildings Section as an Architectural Assistant. It was in this role in 1961 that he became involved with Whitehall Palace. 10 Downing Street was being reconstructed for Harold Macmillan, the then Prime Minister, by Raymond Erith and, as work progressed, it became evident that there were significant archaeological remains on the site.
 
‘This should have been no surprise, as the Survey of London had identified the possibility 30 years before. The Ancient Monument Inspectors, Peter Curnow FSA, John Charlton FSA and John Hurst FSA, fought for access and Michael, a very junior architect, persuaded them that he should effectively direct the investigations, which were undertaken with largely volunteer labour and support from the London Museum. The excavations revealed Roman, Saxon and Medieval Westminster, and succeeded in reconstructing the layout of the site’s Tudor and later palace. Recording continued for two years in the face of fierce official hostility – on several occasions Michael was ordered off the site.
 
‘When, a few years later, it was decided to build a large underground car park in Abingdon Street opposite the House of Lords, Michael was asked again to conduct the excavations, revealing the south waterfront of the Medieval palace and leaving it exposed as a setting for the Jewel House, a monument in care. He wrote interim reports on both Whitehall and Westminster, but time or resources were not made available for him to complete them and it was left to others, many years later, to help him bring them to fruition.
 
‘In a long career as an Investigator and Inspector at the Directorate of Ancient Monuments and Historic Buildings, and then English Heritage, Michael had a determination to preserve and understand buildings, landscapes and archaeological remains. He was a charming colleague with a penchant for a good lunch, but no respecter of management. He was a Senior Investigator during the Heseltine resurvey, a job that used his highly perceptive architectural skills. His most famous moment was in 1977 when he recommended the Jubilee Hall at Covent Garden for listing, putting a kybosh on a vicious plan by the Greater London Council to redevelop the area. Such obstructions of powerful political and financial interests filled him with glee.
 
‘Michael had an emotional and spiritual connection with the belief systems of the ancient societies he excavated, which led to a growing interest in the esoteric and the paranormal. He became a convincing dowser, entertaining his dinner guests by encouraging them to dowse an anomaly that ran through his elegant flat in Clapham. In the 1990s he became increasingly fascinated by crop circles, founding a society for their scientific study, and contributing a substantial chapter to Crop Circles: Harbingers of World Change (1991). In the face of a great deal of scepticism, both public and professional, he continued a deep interest in the subject, but one that diversified into a range of metaphysical issues. 
 
‘More practical issues fascinated him too, and in the 2000s he started to work seriously on the early history of Clapham. From the windows of his flat could be seen the Common which he proceeded to analyse with archaeological and topographical precision. His book Historic Clapham, illustrated with his own maps, diagrams and drawings, was published in 2008, and a revised version was printed the following year.
 
‘Michael was extremely charming, tall, handsome and an elegant dresser with signature pale suits, hats and neckerchiefs: he was never short of female admirers. Some people, at first, found him a bit patrician, but would soon discover the kindness of spirit and a bright twinkle in his eye. He took a great interest in the young and encouraged and supported many people at the start of their careers.

'He was one of the last gentlemen antiquarians – a man with no archaeological or historical training who had an innate understanding of historic buildings, places and ancient peoples. His excavations made a significant contribution to our understanding of Roman Britain and of Westminster. He leaves behind his wife Christine, an eminent Egyptologist, five children from two marriages, a host of friends and admirers and a richer understanding of the world in which we live.’
 
Simon Thurley, former Chief Executive of English Heritage, does not mention in the above that he himself grew up in Godmanchester. It was joining Green’s digs as a child, he has said, that drew him into archaeology. Later, while researching his postgraduate degrees, he worked for Green helping him write up the Whitehall excavation, which was published under their joint names in 1987. The jacket to Durovigutum: Roman Godmanchester notes that Green’s father was ‘a dentist, a WW1 flying ace and a Colonel in the Northamptonshire Regiment, who died in action with the British Expeditionary Force at Ypres in 1940. Michael was brought up by his mother.’
 
Andy Thomas remembers Green on his website, The Truth Agenda, as ‘an important figure in the world of paranormal research’:

‘Described in Jim Schnabel’s mischievous book Round in Circles, slightly cruelly if not entirely inaccurately, as a cross between Peter Ustinov and Harpo Marx,’ writes Thomas, ‘Michael … with his light-coloured suits, stylish hats and deep knowledge of the esoteric, was in more ways than one a towering figure with a vital enthusiasm and determination.’
 
He plotted ‘an audacious plan to try to film the creation of a “real” [crop circle] formation by deploying clairvoyance to arrange a rendezvous with the forces behind them… Along the way Michael exposed a whole new generation to areas such as the studies of the theosophist Alice Bailey (of whom he was a great admirer), while acquainting them with Devic forces and nature spirits, lost languages, various ancient deities, thoughts on Atlantis and ruminating on the likes of beings from the star system Fomalhaut. Eventually people began to better understand the sources he was quoting and once one grasped the interconnecting layers of complex metaphysics he was trying to bring together for a wider audience, a kind of sense to it emerged.’ The photo at top is by Andy Thomas (1994).
 
*

Elizabeth Hartley FSA died on 31 January aged 75. She was elected a Fellow of the Society in November 1995.
 
The marriage of Elizabeth Blank to the late Brian Hartley FSA was announced in the New York Times in 1973. ‘The bride’, said the paper, ‘is a graduate of the Kent Place School in Summit [New Jersey] and Mount Holyoke College. She spent her junior year at the University of Edinburgh, and after graduation continued her studies at the University of London.’ The couple had met in the British Museum when Elizabeth had been the late Kenneth Painter FSA’s research assistant. She had been Keeper of Archaeology at the Yorkshire Museum in York since 1971, and they moved to the city and extensively renovated a fine 18th-century house. She stayed at the museum until retirement in 2007.
 
She oversaw several significant exhibitions in York, including The Viking Kingdom of York (1976) and The Vikings in England (1982), which was awarded a Special Exhibition Award in the European Museum of the Year scheme. Martin Henig FSA remembers working with Hartley for a major exhibition which opened in York in 2006:
 
‘Despite the usual limited resources, Betty determined that Constantine the Great: York's Roman Emperor would match the other exhibitions that year in continental Europe [Constantine was proclaimed Emperor in York on 25 July 306]. She managed to assemble a cast of scholars, including Averil Cameron FSA, Kenneth Painter FSA, Richard Abdy, Bill Manning FSA and others. Together with Jane Hawkes FSA and myself, she selected objects, edited the catalogue and wrote a fair proportion of it.
 
‘I spent a delightful week with her going to Trier, Bonn and Leiden selecting objects. It was an enjoyable but exhausting process. Betty was in love with Constantine, though I (despite being an Anglican priest) feel his influence was ultimately baleful... I think such tensions, seeing the early fourth-century world in all its diversity, made for the success of the venture in which Elizabeth Hartley deserves so much credit. We were all unpaid, but the telephone would ring at any hour of the day or night asking one to write another catalogue entry or so in double quick time. But as well as the sort of international exhibition which is very rare in a provincial city in Britain, the catalogue with its introductory essays has become a standard work on Constantine.’
 
The funeral will be held at St Olave's Church, Marygate, York, on Tuesday 27 February at 10.30 am, to which all friends are invited, followed by a private cremation. Enquiries to J G Fielder & Son Funeral Directors, 01904 654460.
 
*

Ray Sutcliffe FSA died on 2 February aged 77. He was elected a Fellow of the Society in January 1990.
 
A researcher and producer with the BBC for many archaeological and historical films, Sutcliffe (on right in photo) was interviewed by Angela Piccini in 2008. Writing in British Archaeology she says that he was ‘dragged around’ castles, historic houses and museums by his father, but ‘it was through the media that he developed his interest in archaeology.’
 
‘After reading History at Cambridge,’ says Piccini, ‘Sutcliffe’s first job was Historian for the London County Council Historic Buildings Department architects. Producing visual and archival evidence that would assist in fighting building preservation cases, he was introduced to photography. “It was great fun,” he said, but prominent losses, such as the Euston Arch, were frustrating. In 1963 he spotted an advert for staff for a new channel called BBC2, and made his move.'
 
BBC2 was recruiting an entire team to create new programmes. The rostrum camera then in use was a 6m-high gallows with chains either side to hold a 1938 35mm Mitchell camera. While making a programme about the Great Fire of London, Sutcliffe worked with Ken Morse to develop a more flexible camera to film artefacts and objects. They used a much smaller 16mm Arriflex camera, which allowed shooting the sequence as live action rather than stop-frame.
 
‘We used to get rather cross with TV critics sometimes because technically there was simply no other way’, he told Piccini. In Animal, Vegetable, Mineral (1952–59), the title sequence showing a spinning box with a question mark did not stop at the right point, ‘because they had it on an old gramophone table’. For The Great War (1964), the BBC’s first archival-footage-based series for television, all the dubbing had to be done as a single shot. A technician at the back ran between six flat-bed players with effects disks to switch them on to precise timing.
 
On Chronicle, a major archaeology strand, Sutcliffe followed his love of ships. He was involved in films on Sutton Hoo (he makes frequent appearances in Sutton Hoo Research Committee Bulletins 1983–1993 ed Martin Carver FSA, 1993) and the Spanish Armada. But his best-known work was the start of the Mary Rose project and 1970’s Great Iron Ship, which followed the rescue of the SS Great Britain in the Falkland Islands. A 1988 film watched British Museum conservator Nigel Williams’ year-long restoration of the Portland vase: Sutcliffe said a photographer ignored strict instructions on the use of lights, and ‘the ageing adhesive failed spectacularly and the planned conservation process began rather earlier than intended’. His last single-subject programme was The Electric Revolution – the archaeology of electricity with Kenneth Hudson FSA, creating a unique record of the interior of Battersea Power Station immediately after its shutdown. ‘The exciting aspect of making an archaeology programme’, he said, ‘is that nothing goes to plan.’
 
Sutcliffe appeared with fellow broadcasters Sir David Attenborough FSA, David Collison and Anna Benson Gyles in a filmed Personal Histories event at the University of Cambridge in 2009. Maritime archaeology, he said, was ‘an area where the viewers couldn't go themselves. You could take them somewhere, as David [Attenborough] takes people into wild jungles, somewhere where the viewer themselves couldn’t actually participate; so it broadened that experience completely.’
 
‘Ray was an erudite humanist, a professional film-maker and constant advocate and activist for human history and archaeology,’ wrote Pat Baker from Perth, Australia. After bringing the SS Great Britain back to the UK, ‘Non-diver Ray spent the rest of his life promoting maritime archaeology and history, and much else, spending much of his time and considerable energy with projects for preservation and protection of mankind’s past. In '89 he brought his film crew to Western Australia to tell the Batavia story, superbly, for one of the final BBC Chronicle films. Ray fell in love with Australia, especially the West, and continued to visit fairly regularly for the next 21 years.’ The photo at top is by Pat Baker.

The funeral will be held at Mortlake Crematorium, Meadow Path, Townmead Road, Richmond TW9 4EN on Wednesday 7 March at 12.00 noon, followed by ‘a pint or three – and some jazz – at Ray's favourite pub, the Forrester's Arms in Hampton Wick. He was extremely popular in that local community,’ writes Byrne McLeod, ‘so it seemed only fitting that we should end up there after the funeral.’

*

The LRB blog (London Review of Books, 7 February) has published Jonathan Meades’ eulogy for Gavin Stamp FSA, who died in December. It was read at the funeral on 25 January by Otto Saumarez Smith.
 
‘Gavin tirelessly articulated the discontents of the many’, wrote Meades, ‘whose lives are screwed by the cupidity of the few. Architecture and buildings are political. And Gavin was, among much else, a political writer – a political writer in disguise, but a supremely political writer.’
 
‘Architecture is evidence by which our forebears and their civilisations can be assessed, evidence which the present whiggishly destroys because it believes that it will necessarily do better precisely because it has progressed to become the present. Gavin abhorred this fallacious smugness and fought it as it should be fought – ad hominem. For architecture is not some parthenogenetic miracle. It is the creation of humans – who are to be taken to task.’
 

Memorials to Fellows 




Leslie Smith FSA sends these photos of the markers of a Fellow in Kent. He writes:
 
‘The body of Rupert Forbes Gunnis FSA lies in the Streatfield mausoleum (his mother was a Streatfield) in the churchyard of St Mary's, Chiddingstone. The mausoleum was designed in 1736 by Henry Streatfield, whose family seat was Chiddingstone Castle. Within the church is a small brass plaque in the splay of a nave south window, beneath the cross for his brother Captain Geoffrey Gunnis MC Grenadier Guards who died in 1916. This was originally in the cemetery of St Sever, Rouen but moved, in 1923, when it was replaced by a stone. Rupert's plaque reads: In memory of Rupert Forbes Gunnis, Author, Antiquary, Lover of the Arts, 11 March 1899 – 31 July 1965.
 


‘Gunnis is perhaps best remembered for his monumental work Dictionary of British Sculptors 1660–1851 published in 1953 with a second edition in 1968. An expanded edition was published in 2009 by Ingrid Roscoe FSA.'

 

The Wisdom of Fellows 


Following news that the Bayeux Tapestry is to be loaned for display in the UK, Salon ran two pieces featuring Fellows’ extensive work on the Medieval masterpiece (Bienvenue au Bayeux Tapestry and #MoiAussi, the Bayeux Tapestry and the Society's Copies). The topic continues to draw correspondence.
 
Madeline H Caviness FSA, Mary Richardson Professor Emeritus at Tufts University, Massachusetts, wrote about ‘the Bayeux Embroidery (sic)’ in Chapter 2 of her Reframing Medieval Art: Difference, Margins, Boundaries, an electronic book published by Tufts University in 2001. In a long, extensively illustrated text, she ‘ponders the exclusion of women from a famous pictorial chronicle’, which begins with its popular naming as Tapestry (‘a term that is readily associated with the large male-dominated workshops of northern Europe in the late middle ages’) instead of its correct description as Embroidery (which ‘evokes the manual work of women’). The chapter, Caviness tells Salon, was revised for print as ‘Anglo-Saxon Women, Norman Knights, and a “Third Sex” in the Bayeux Embroidery,’ in The Bayeux Tapestry: New Interpretations, ed Martin K Foys, Karen Overbey and Dan Terkla (2009).
 
There is a complete 19th-century copy in the US, she adds. The anonymous work is done in pen and ink and watercolour on paper, and mounted on linen; it is 68ft 6in long and 10in high. It is in the Mount Holyoke College Library, Special Collections, and described by Caviness in her articles: ‘A bowdlerized copy of the Embroidery, made at an English boys’ school by a master and his class about the time the first pornography law went on the books (1857), confirms the emphasis on male genitalia in the original; all are excised.’
 
Richard Barber FSA says the Folio Society produced a replica of the tapestry last July. ‘I haven’t had a chance to see it myself,’ he writes, ‘but it is the latest idea from their very imaginative production director, Joe Whitlock Blundell, who has been responsible for their superb manuscript facsimiles.’ A continually printed 43-m long scroll, at 60% of its actual size, is mounted in a custom-made box, and can be bought for £1,920. Whitlock Blundell describes the project in a video.
 
‘Thank you for interesting pieces on the Bayeux Tapestry,' writes Barbara English FSA, ‘someone in London did a great job of finding connections [actually the editor is based in Wiltshire]. I am sorry to say that the Hayward exhibition I mentioned [at which the Society’s 19th-century copy by Stothard was displayed] was 1984.’
 
*

Norman Hammond FSA has an appeal to Fellows:
 
‘I am trying to find out more about Richard Charles Edward Long (1872–1951), who spent his career as a solicitor in Portarlington, Co Kildare, but who made several significant contributions to the decipherment of ancient Maya hieroglyphic writing between 1925 and 1950. So far I have a one-page obituary from a Mexican journal and a half-page one from Man (53, 1952), plus a photo of his house from somebody who remembered the family. But nary a picture of the man himself, nor any Irish newspaper obituaries of the sort you might expect for a solid citizen of a small town. What local paper would have served Portarlington? Perhaps one of our Fellows in Ireland can help me?’
 
While writing, Hammond points out that The Print Before Photography: An Introduction to European Printmaking 1550–1820 by Antony Griffiths FSA, mentioned in Salon 399, was awarded a 2017 British Academy Medal last September. I noted James Stevens Curl FSA’s President’s Medal (Salon 393), but I also missed Joyce Reynolds FSA, who was awarded the Kenyon Medal (endowed by Sir Frederic Kenyon FSA) for ‘her lifetime’s contribution to the research and study of Roman epigraphy’. Sorry.
 
*

I was pleased to feature an essay by Julian Munby FSA in the last Salon, reporting from an exhibition celebrating the Egyptian Expeditionary Force’s taking of the keys of Jerusalem in 1917 (Allenby at the Gates of Jerusalem). Munby and colleagues visited the grave of Sir Flinders Petrie, noting that Petrie had been buried headless. (‘Bless @SocAntiquaries in its e-bulletin for this corker,’ tweeted Joe Flatman FSA: “Sir Flinders Petrie… donated his head to science… Even more curiously still, he never became an FSA” … because buried headless: not curious at all. Nope, nothing to see here (literally). But not being a Fellow: VERY curious. I mean no pressure or anything here folks…’)
 
Robert Merrillees FSA has more to say about the well-travelled head:
 
‘Having studied in the Department of Egyptology at University College London where Sir W M Flinders Petrie was first Professor, stayed in the W F Albright Institute of Archaeological Research in Jerusalem where Petrie spent the last years of his life, and having visited Petrie's grave in the Protestant Cemetery on Mount Zion, I was particularly interested in Julian Munby's report.
 
‘The saga of Petrie's head is one of the more bizarre episodes in his otherwise inspiring career. In asking that he be decapitated after death and his head sent to London for examination by the Royal College of Surgeons, he was reflecting the influence of Sir Francis Galton FRS, pioneer of eugenics. But the Second World War upset plans for the head's transportation – Petrie died in Jerusalem in 1942 – and it remained stored in a container with a preserving liquid agent in the Palestine Archaeological (now Rockefeller) Museum where Israeli archaeologist, Trude Dothan, remembered working with it close to her. After the War arrangements were made with the Director of Antiquities in Jerusalem to ship the head to London as an antiquity, and it now resides, out of public view, in the Royal College of Surgeons, where it was reattributed to Petrie by Shimon Gibson in 1989: the label on the glass jar had fallen off and the College wanted verification of its identity.
 
‘On 30 July 2012 a ceremony was held at Petrie's grave on the 70th anniversary of his death, organised by the Israel Antiquities Authority and attended by more than one hundred archaeologists, Bible scholars and “aficianados of the ancient past”. A news report on the event recalled that in 1918, after the British had captured Jerusalem from the Turks, Petrie suggested a modern suburb be started outside the Old City to which the entire population would be transferred, thus enabling ancient Jerusalem to be cleared down to the Solomonic town and kept “as a Jewel of the Past, visited by all but appropriated by none”. And when he became bed-ridden in October 1940 in the Government Hospital in Jerusalem where Mortimer Wheeler FSA saw him, Petrie wrote a poem foreshadowing the end of his days:
 
No more the running boy in English woods,
No more to roam the ewe-leaze and the tor,
No more to delve in pyramids and towns,
No more to trace the thoughts of man of yore,
No more, no more.
 

Gifts to the Library

January - August 2017

The Society is very grateful to the donors of the following books, given to the Library in the period from January to August 2017. These books are, or will shortly be, available in the Library, with full records on the online catalogue www.sal.org.uk/library

From David Andrews, FSA,
  • Discovering Coggeshall: Timber-framed buildings in the town centre by David Stenning with Richard Shackle
  • Discovering Coggeshall 2: The 1575 rental survey and the dated buildings edited by David Andrews (2013)
From Revd Jerome Bertram, FSA, Newark Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene by Brenda M. Pask (2000)

From the co-author, Revd Jerome Bertram, FSA, Alan Fleming’s Brass at Newark (2017)

From Alan Bott, FSA, A history of the Gothic Revival by Charles L. Eastlake (1872)

From the author, Revd Roger Brown, FSA, In places where they sit: a social history of the church pew in Wales (2016)

From Derrick Chivers, FSA, Catalogo monumental de Navarra: I. Merindad de Tudela by María Concepción García Gainza et al. (1980)

From Paul Drury, FSA, Conservation today by David Pearce (1989)

From the author, Stephen Freeth, FSA, A guide to the Merchant Taylors' Company (2016)

From the author, Jackie Keily, FSA, Tunnel: The archaeology of Crossrail (2017)

From the author, Mike McCarthy, FSA, Carlisle: a frontier and border city (2018)

From the author, Bernard Nurse, FSA, London: Prints and Drawings before 1800 (2017)

From the co-author, Ann Payne, FSA, “Medicine for a great household (ca 1500): Berkeley Castle muniments select book 89” in Studies in Medieval and Renaissance History, Third Series, Vol. XII (2016)

From Peter Webster, FSA, Luftbild und Vorgeschichte (1938)
 

Forthcoming Events for Fellows


You can catch up on meetings you've missed by watching our lecture recordings (visit the events page and filter the results list by choosing 'past events'). 

Ordinary Meetings of Fellows

Interested in proposing a lecture? Please download the Lecture Proposal Form, and email it to Amelia Carruthers, Communications Manager (acarruthers@sal.org.uk).

Introductory Tours for Fellows

If you've never visited Burlington House or had an introduction to the Library and Collections, please join an introductory tour. You'll meet the Society's professional staff, learn about your Fellowship benefits, and discover more from the collections at Burlington House. 

19 April: Tours are free, but booking is required >
28 June: Tours are free, but booking is required >

Forthcoming Public Events


Conferences and Seminars

Public Lectures

Public Lectures are held from 13.00 to 14.00 on Tuesdays, with advance booking advised to be sure of a place.  Click here for more information on our public lectures. We also run public tours of the building (£10) preceding the lectures above.
 

Regional Fellows Groups

 

South West Fellows

8 March: 'Feeding Anglo-Saxon England,' (Out of London Ordinary Meeting of Fellows, held in Exeter). Find out more online.

Want to join the South West Regional Fellows Group? If you would like to receive email updates about forthcoming meetings, you can subscribe online at: http://eepurl.com/MvHUr
 

Welsh Fellows

22 March: 'The Legionary Fortress at Caerleon,' (Out of London Ordinary Meeting of Fellows, held in Cardiff). Find out more online.

Want to join the Welsh Regional Fellows Group? If you would like to receive email updates about forthcoming meetings, email Bob Child at bob.child@ntlworld.com.
 

York Fellows

29 November: 'Surveying Shakespeare's Guildhall: a public building in pre-modern England' (Out of London Ordinary Meeting of Fellows, held in York). Find out more online.

Want to join the York Regional Fellows Group? If you would like to receive email updates about forthcoming meetings in York, you can subscribe online at: http://eepurl.com/8nvxL
 

Other Forthcoming Heritage Events

21 February: Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern (London)
Tessa Murdoch FSA (V&A) talks about Master and Apprentice: Transferring skills in the London Huguenot communities, in a lecture series at the Warburg Institute organised by Joanne Anderson and Eckart Marchand. The overall aim is to speak to an interdisciplinary audience interested in issues such as agency and the commission, production and the use of art works and objects, as well as those attuned to the theoretical implications these issues have for visual and material culture of all ages. Details online.

24 February: New Thinking about Sixteenth-Century Furniture (London)
A Regional Furniture Society event at the V&A covering topics such as Gothic to Renaissance furniture, from carved oak to marquetry, the role of immigrant craftsmen, imported pieces and recycled fragments. this event will look at the latest research on this intriguing century, based on close study of surviving examples. Details online.
 
26 February: The French Financial Crisis in the Late Reign of Louis XV (London)
In the bicentenary of Richard Wallace’s birth, the Wallace Collection is focusing on collecting in London and Paris in the later 19th century. In a series of Monday History of Collecting Seminars organised by Suzanne Higgott FSA, Alden Gordon (Paul E Raether Distinguished Professor of Fine Arts, Trinity College, Hartford, CT, USA) will speak on ‘Heureux ceux qui ont un Coeur de bronze…’: The French financial crisis in the late reign of Louis XV and its impact on royal manufactures and royal patronage. Details online.
 
28 February: Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern (London)
Joris van Gastel (Bibliotheca Hertziana, Rome) talks about The Bernini Workshop (Re)visited, in a lecture series at the Warburg Institute organised by Joanne Anderson and Eckart Marchand. The overall aim is to speak to an interdisciplinary audience interested in issues such as agency and the commission, production and the use of art works and objects, as well as those attuned to the theoretical implications these issues have for visual and material culture of all ages. Details online.

7 March: Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern (London)
Michelle O’Malley (Warburg Institute) talks about Botticelli, his assistants and the business of the workshop, in a lecture series at the Warburg Institute organised by Joanne Anderson and Eckart Marchand. The overall aim is to speak to an interdisciplinary audience interested in issues such as agency and the commission, production and the use of art works and objects, as well as those attuned to the theoretical implications these issues have for visual and material culture of all ages. Details online.
 
7 March: St James’s and the Birth of the West End (London)
Simon Thurley FSA, Visiting Gresham Professor of the Built Environment at Gresham College, talks about London at the Museum of London. In the first of two lectures with the theme Buildings in the West End of London: Palace, Park and Square, he looks into the ingredients that went into making a court quarter there and the way it formed a blueprint for the new West End of London. Details online.
 
8 March: Law and the Historic Environment (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This provides an introduction for all who need to gain a broad understanding of the main legislative, regulatory and policy regimes for the historic environment, the ways in which those regimes are being applied at present, and the implications in practice for those working in the area. Details online.

10 March: Anglo-Saxon London (London)
The seventh London Anglo-Saxon Symposium (LASS) will be held in Senate House, University of London. Drawing on literary, archaeological and historical sources, we will consider how London was created as a physical and conceptual place in Anglo-Saxon England. We will then enjoy performances based on readings from Old English poems by students from Royal Holloway, University of London. We will end with a wine reception. Speakers include Susan Hirst FSA and Andrew Reynolds FSA. Details online.
 
17 March: Interpreting Medieval Monuments: Iconography and Meaning (London)
A Church Monuments Society conference in Senate House. The speakers will include Sally Badham FSA, Brian Gittos FSA, Moira Gittos FSA, Nicola Jennings FSA and Sophie Oosterwijk FSA. See online for details.

19–21 March: Radiocarbon Dating and Bayesian Chronological Analysis (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This is aimed at researchers using radiocarbon and other techniques, including Quaternary geologists, palaeobiologists, archaeologists and marine geoscientists. The first two days will cover radiocarbon dating including sample selection, laboratory processes and Bayesian analyses. The third day will look at the construction of Bayesian chronologies more generally, including those that rely on other techniques, with a focus on environmental records. Course Director Christopher Ramsey FSA. Details online.
 
21 March: Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern (London)
Andy Murray (Open University) talks about The Socialisation and Specialisation of Workshop Labour at the Charterhouse of Champmol, in a lecture series at the Warburg Institute organised by Joanne Anderson and Eckart Marchand. The overall aim is to speak to an interdisciplinary audience interested in issues such as agency and the commission, production and the use of art works and objects, as well as those attuned to the theoretical implications these issues have for visual and material culture of all ages. Details online.

24 March: Peopling the Heath – Petersfield Heath and its Region in Prehistory (Petersfield)
A free conference organised by Petersfield Museum about a project exploring a local bronze age barrow cemetery. Speakers include Stuart Needham FSA (Funerary Offerings and their Significance, and Bronze Age Communities of the Rother Valley and their World), Jacqueline McKinley FSA (Diverse Rites: Mortuary Practice in Early Bronze Age Wessex), Nick Branch FSA (Bronze Age Environment and Human Impact) and David Field FSA (Barrows and Fields: the Bronze Age Landscape). Details online.

26 March: William Gladstone and the National Gallery (London)
In the bicentenary of Richard Wallace’s birth, the Wallace Collection is focusing on collecting in London and Paris in the later 19th century. In a series of Monday History of Collecting Seminars organised by Suzanne Higgott FSA, Barbara Pezzini (PhD candidate, University of Manchester, and Editor-in-chief, Routledge-Taylor & Francis Journal) will speak about The Politics of Public Collecting: William Gladstone and the National Gallery. Details online.
 
27 March: Charles I: King and Collector (London)
Reuniting an illustrious royal art collection, the exhibition Charles I: King and Collector marks the Royal Academy of Arts 250th anniversary. In celebration of this landmark event, Martin Randall Travel, a specialist in cultural tours, is holding an exclusive Charles I study day with lectures at the Society of Antiquaries. Hear from Per Rumberg, Curator at the Royal Academy, Desmond Shawe-Taylor, Surveyor of The Queen’s Pictures, and historian Leanda de Lisle, author of the forthcoming book White King: Charles I – Traitor, Murderer, Martyr. The talks are followed by a two-course lunch at a nearby restaurant and an afternoon visit of the exhibition. Details online.

11 April: Starting in Post-Excavation (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This will introduce participants to post-excavation and the process that takes us from site record to completed report. The focus will be on report types common in professional practice and generated by development-led fieldwork. It will be ideal for archaeologists in, or moving into, supervisory roles that involve report preparation. Details online.
 
16–18 April: Condition Surveys of Historic Buildings (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This aims to give participants an understanding of traditional construction and its defects, and to provide the skills to carry out balanced and informed surveys of historic buildings. Course Director Henry Russell FSA, Reading University. Details online.

18 April: The Birth of Modern Theatreland: Covent Garden and the Two Theatres Royal (London)
Simon Thurley FSA, Visiting Gresham Professor of the Built Environment at Gresham College, talks about London at the Museum of London. In the second of two lectures with the theme Buildings in the West End of London: Palace, Park and Square, he looks at the significance and impact of theatres on the development of London. Details online.

19 April: Advanced Condition Surveys of Historic Buildings (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This builds on the knowledge and skills developed by an earlier course (16–19 April) and offers advanced additional guidance on a number of specialised topics such as non-destructive investigations, energy efficiency, mechanical and electrical services and wall paintings. Course Director Henry Russell FSA. Details online.
 
19 April: An Evening with Lambeth Palace Library Conservators (London)
An opportunity to view the Lambeth Palace Library conservation studio and discuss techniques and treatments with the Library’s conservation staff. Please note that the studio is reached by a Medieval spiral staircase. Numbers will be limited, please book in advance with juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org or phone 020 7898 1400.

21 April: Ludlow Palmers Symposium on English Tiles (Ludlow)
A symposium at St Laurence Church, Ludlow will be followed by a visit to the Jackfield Tile Museum, Ironbridge. There will also be an opportunity to visit the Ludlow Museum Resource Centre on 20 April, to view a collection of 500 medieval floor tiles from across Shropshire. Speakers include Ian Betts, Hans van Lemmen and Lesley Durbin. Details online.

28 April: The Lived Experience of Women in Roman Cumbria and Beyond (Maryport)
A day conference at the Senhouse Roman Museum, inspired by the 100th anniversary of the Representation of the People Act 1918, will present and discuss the lives of women at the north-western edge of the Roman Empire. Speakers include Maureen Carroll FSA, Ursula Rothe, Alex Croom FSA, Elizabeth M Greene, Tatiana Ivleva and David Breeze FSA. The conference will be chaired by Maureen Fordham. Details online.
 
28 April: The Lived Experience of Women in Roman Cumbria and Beyond (Maryport)
A day conference at the Senhouse Roman Museum, inspired by the 100th anniversary of the Representation of the People Act 1918, will discuss the lives of women at the edge of the Roman Empire. Speakers include Maureen Carroll FSA, Ursula Rothe, Alex Croom FSA and David Breeze FSA. The conference will be chaired by Maureen Fordham. Details from the museum on 01900 816168 or at senhousemuseum@aol.com.

28 April: Ancient to Modern: The Changing Landscape of Sussex (Lewes)
A day conference offering a broad overview of the changing relationship between the Sussex landscape and the people who lived there, from the earliest arrivals. The emphasis will be on how new ideas resulted in significant changes in the use of the Sussex landscape. Speakers, specialists in their periods, include Sue Berry FSA, John Manley FSA, David Martin FSA and Matt Pope FSA. Details online.

30 April: Collecting Rembrandt’s Art in Britain (London)
In the bicentenary of Richard Wallace’s birth, the Wallace Collection is focusing on collecting in London and Paris in the later 19th century. In a series of Monday History of Collecting Seminars organised by Suzanne Higgott FSA, C Tico Seifert (Senior Curator, Northern European Art, Scottish National Gallery) will speak about Rembrandt. Details online.

4 May: Stratigraphic Analysis in Archaeology (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This is for those familiar with excavation and stratigraphic recording, looking to develop post-excavation skills in analysis, dating, interpretation and description. Details online.
 
5 May: Roman and Saxon Surrey (Ashtead)
The Surrey Archaeological Society’s major conference focuses on the period AD410–470, under the title Shining a Light on the 5th Century AD in Surrey and the South-East: How did Roman Britain Become Saxon England? ‘We feel that (historic) Surrey and adjoining counties ought to be a key area for understanding the transition from Roman to Saxon', writes David Bird FSA, 'but we are faced with the problem of having very little archaeological evidence for the period.’ Speakers include Peter Guest FSA, Sam Lucy FSA, Helena Hamerow FSA and John Hines FSA. Details online.

8 May: ‘Mysteries’ Demystified: The Making and Meaning of the Lambeth Articles (1595) (London)
Nicholas Tyacke FSA, whose books include Altars Restored: The Changing Face of English Religious Worship 1547–c 1700, will talk at the Lambeth Palace Library in association with the University of London seminar on the Religious History of Britain 1500–1800. Details online, or email juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org.
 
9 May: Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern (London)
Adam Lowe (Factum Arte, Madrid) talks about Mediation and Transformation | Alchemy and New Technology: Factum Arte’s workshop practice in an age of 3D recording and printing, in a lecture series at the Warburg Institute organised by Joanne Anderson and Eckart Marchand. The overall aim is to speak to an interdisciplinary audience interested in issues such as agency and the commission, production and the use of art works and objects in the widest possible sense, as well as those attuned to the theoretical implications these issues have for visual and material culture of all ages. Details online.
 
9–10 May: The Setting of Heritage Assets and Places (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. In the context of official guidance and wide-ranging experience of practical casework, this explains why the setting of historic places matters, and the principles and practical skills of sound assessment and decision-making. Course Director George Lambrick FSA, with Stephen Carter, Ian Houlston, Richard Morrice FSA, Julian Munby FSA, Michael Pirie, Ken Smith FSA, Karin Taylor and David Woolley QC. Details online.
 
16 May: Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern (London)
Glyn Davis (Museum of London) talks about Order from Chaos? Trying to Make Sense of Medieval Art Workshops, in a lecture series at the Warburg Institute organised by Joanne Anderson and Eckart Marchand. The overall aim is to speak to an interdisciplinary audience interested in issues such as agency and the commission, production and the use of art works and objects in the widest possible sense, as well as those attuned to the theoretical implications these issues have for visual and material culture of all ages. Details online.
 
17 May: A Life on the Road: the Exploits and Adventures of the 17th-Century Ottoman Traveller, Evliya Çelebi (London)
A British Institute at Ankara lecture by Caroline Finkel (Honorary Fellow, University of Edinburgh) at the British Academy, 10-11 Carlton House Terrace. In 1640, aged 29, the Ottoman courtier Evliya Çelebi left Istanbul for the first time, to visit Bursa. He spent the rest of his life journeying to the ends of the sultan’s domains and beyond, from Vienna to the Sea of Azov to far up the Nile, and wrote in detail of his experiences. His informative, entertaining and often fantastical Seyahatname or Book of Travels is considered the longest travel account in world literature. Details online.

17 May: Project Management in Archaeology: an Introduction (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This is designed for those new to project management and will draw on the extensive experience of the tutors in development-led archaeology. Details online.

21 May: The Circulation of Gifts from the 1875–76 Tour of India (London)
In the bicentenary of Richard Wallace’s birth, the Wallace Collection is focusing on collecting in London and Paris in the later 19th century. In a series of Monday History of Collecting Seminars organised by Suzanne Higgott FSA, Kajal Meghani (Exhibition Assistant Curator, Royal Collection Trust) will speak on 'The Prince of Wales' Indian Collection': the circulation of gifts from the 1875-6 tour of India. Details online.

5 June: New Perspectives on Seventeenth-Century Libraries (London)
This event at Lambeth Palace Library will showcase some recent research on library formation, public and private, in the 17th century. Three short talks, among them Jacqueline Glomski FSA on ‘Religion and Libraries in the Seventeenth Century’, will deal with patterns of book selection and acquisition as revealed by individual practice and in 17th-century theoretical writing on bibliography. The presentations will discuss the potential for research and the application of digital methods. In association with the University of London research seminar on the History of Libraries. Details online, or email juliette.boyd@churchofengland.org.

8 June: Delivering Public Benefit through Archaeology (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This looks at planning projects to deliver public benefit, how to communicate that benefit, and how to evaluate the impact. It is designed for those responsible for commissioning, specifying and/or delivering programmes of work that aim to deliver public benefit. Details online.
 
25 June: 'Sèvres-mania'? (London)
In the bicentenary of Richard Wallace’s birth, the Wallace Collection is focusing on collecting in London and Paris in the later 19th century. In a series of Monday History of Collecting Seminars organised by Suzanne Higgott FSA, Caroline McCaffrey-Howarth FSA (PhD Candidate and History of Art Tutor, University of Leeds) will speak about 'Sèvres-mania'? The History of Collecting Sèvres Porcelain in Britain in the Later 19th century. Details online.
 
27 June: Re-opening the Workshop: Medieval to Early Modern (London)
Therese Martin FSA (Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid) talks about Re-opening the Treasury: Meaning in Materials at San Isidoro de León, in a lecture series at the Warburg Institute organised by Joanne Anderson and Eckart Marchand. The overall aim is to speak to an interdisciplinary audience interested in issues such as agency and the commission, production and the use of art works and objects, as well as those attuned to the theoretical implications these issues have for visual and material culture of all ages. Details online.
 
6 July: Churches: History, Significance and Use (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This provides a firm foundation of the history of church architecture and furnishings, and provides skills to draft statements of significance, aimed particularly at those actively involved in management of church buildings. Details online.
 
30 July: J C Robinson's Collection at Auction (London)
In the bicentenary of Richard Wallace’s birth, the Wallace Collection is focusing on collecting in London and Paris in the later 19th century. In a series of Monday History of Collecting Seminars organised by Suzanne Higgott FSA, Elizabeth Pergam (Lecturer, Sotheby’s Institute of Art, New York, NY) will speak about Paris over London: Victorian Curator J C Robinson's Collection at Auction. Details online.
 
15 September: Deerhurst, Pershore and Westminster Abbey (Deerhurst)
The 2018 Annual Deerhurst Lecture will take place at 7.30 pm in St Mary's Church, Deerhurst and will be given by Richard Mortimer FSA (former archivist to Westminster Abbey). Details online.

19–20 September: Photographing Historic Buildings (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This is aimed at those who are not professional photographers but wish to photograph historic buildings for the record using a digital camera. By the end students will be expected to know how to choose viewpoint and lighting conditions, correctly set up cameras to capture suitable images and how to post-produce images in software ready for the archive. Details online.
 
24 September: The Sale of Sir Peter Lely's Paintings and Prints (London)
In the bicentenary of Richard Wallace’s birth, the Wallace Collection is focusing on collecting in London and Paris in the later 19th century. In a series of Monday History of Collecting Seminars organised by Suzanne Higgott FSA, Saskia van Altena (Cataloguer of prints, Rijksprentenkabinet, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam) will speak on The Sale of Sir Peter Lely's Paintings and Prints: A Breaking Point in the History of Collecting in Britain? Details online.
 
26–28 September: Heritage Values and the Assessment of Significance (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This will introduce the process of significance, show what is involved in preparing significance assessments, teach you how to read and judge such assessments, and explore ways in which they can be used. Details online.

4 October: Post-Excavation Assessment in Practice (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This will introduce recent guidance, and review the essential components of assessment and updated project design. In the afternoon we will review examples from current practice and consider how far they meet their purpose and justify funding decisions. Details online.
 
13 October: Castle Studies: Current Research and the Future (London)
A conference organised by the Castle Studies Group to be held at the Society of Antiquaries will honour Derek Renn FSA, author of Norman Castles in Britain (1969/1973), and launch a Festschrift, Castles: History, Archaeology, Landscape and Architecture, edited by Neil Guy FSA. Speakers include Oliver Creighton FSA, Bob Higham FSA, Brian Kerr FSA, Neil Ludlow FSA and Pamela Marshall FSA. For details contact John R Kenyon FSA, 140 Fairwater Grove East, Llandaff, Cardiff CF5 2JW, before 31 July.

24 October: Artefacts and Ecofacts in and out of the Field (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This will provide expert guidance on how key artefacts and ecofacts can contribute to interpretation of archaeological sites, and good practice in sampling and collection. The course is designed for supervisors, project officers and junior managers with responsibility for running excavations, and those new to specialist artefact and ecofact roles. Details online.
 
29 October: The Last Great Demidoff Sale of Paintings (London)
In the bicentenary of Richard Wallace’s birth, the Wallace Collection is focusing on collecting in London and Paris in the later 19th century. In a series of Monday History of Collecting Seminars organised by Suzanne Higgott FSA, Alexandre Tissot Demidoff (Independent scholar) will speak about the last great Demidoff sale. Details online.
 
30 October: Archaeological Desk-Based Assessments (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This informs participants about the role of desk-based assessments in managing the cultural heritage resource and provides a practical guide to their production. It will also include guidance on the use of desk-based assessments to fulfil the requirements of the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF). Details online.
 
15 November: Archaeological Writing for Publication (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This will introduce standard published reports produced by archaeologists, and how a report is planned. It will then focus on stratigraphic narrative and discussion, with a critical review of examples, to identify common mistakes and how to avoid them. We will also look at the special requirements of writing in a professional and academic context. Details online.

26 November: Sir William Holburne's Display Mounts (London)
In the bicentenary of Richard Wallace’s birth, the Wallace Collection is focusing on collecting in London and Paris in the later 19th century. In a series of Monday History of Collecting Seminars organised by Suzanne Higgott FSA, Catrin Jones (Curator of Decorative Arts, Holburne Museum, Bath) will speak on Piecing Together a Collection: Sir William Holburne's Display Mounts. Details online.
 
28–30 November: Public Inquiry Workshop (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This is a practical workshop designed to improve the performance of anyone who might be called to participate in a Public Inquiry concerned with the historic environment. A mock Public Inquiry will be mounted using a genuine case study, with training for potential witnesses. Details online.

6 December: Commissioning Archaeology (Oxford)
One of a series of short courses for the historic environment put on by Oxford University Department for Continuing Education at Rewley House. This is designed for non-archaeologists who need to work with archaeology within the design and construction process, including architects, surveyors, engineers and other design professionals, planners, and project managers and developers. Details online.

10 December: The Picture Collection of Stephen Alers Hankey (London)
In the bicentenary of Richard Wallace’s birth, the Wallace Collection is focusing on collecting in London and Paris in the later 19th century. In a series of Monday History of Collecting Seminars organised by Suzanne Higgott FSA, Robert Wenley (Deputy Director, Head of Collections, Barber Institute of Fine Arts, University of Birmingham) will speak on ‘Rare and Most Magnificent’: The Picture Collection of Stephen Alers Hankey (1809-1878). Details online.
 

Call for Papers


29 September: The Architecture of James Gibbs (London)
The Georgian Group is organising a day-long symposium on James Gibbs (1682–1754), to be held at the Society of Antiquaries at Burlington House. The symposium will reassess the work of one of the most important, but still underestimated, British architects of the 18th century, responsible for the church of St Martin-in-the-Fields in London and the Radcliffe Camera in Oxford, many other commissions throughout the British Isles, and one of the most important 18th-century architectural pattern books. Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers based on original research on any aspect of Gibbs’s work, including his training, his practice, his patrons and clients, and his influence on contemporary and subsequent architecture and design (including urban, garden and interior design) both in Britain and within the British diaspora. Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words and a CV to Geoffrey Tyack FSA (Kellogg College, Oxford, Editor of the Georgian Group Journal: geoffrey.tyack@kellogg.ox.ac.uk) by the end of February 2018. Notifications of acceptance will be sent before the end of March, and further details will follow soon afterwards.

14 July: Archaeology in Hertfordshire: Recent Research (Welwyn)
The Welwyn Archaeological Society and the Rhodes Museum, Bishops Stortford are pleased to announce the third recent research conference, to be held at the Museum. We are seeking 25-minute papers on all aspects of archaeology in Hertfordshire – very broadly defined – from prehistoric to post-Medieval, including updated work on older projects. If you would like to present at the conference, please send a short abstract to Kris Lockyear at noviodunum@hotmail.com. Indicate if you would be willing to present a poster should your paper not be one of ten chosen. Details online.

15 September: Journal of the Decorative Arts Society 43 (2019)
The DAS journal for 2019 will celebrate cross-cultural influences between British and Continental European designers and makers of decorative art, as well as exchange with designers further afield. The Society’s remit is 1850 to the present, and typical journal articles take an object-focussed approach. The journal audience is knowledgeable and well-informed, but not necessarily academic. Authors are invited to submit proposals of around 750–1,000 words by 15 September 2018, for articles between around 2,500–6,000 words, plus notes, illustrations and captions. Send proposals to the Editor, Megan Aldrich FSA, at meganbrewsteraldrich@gmail.com.
 

Vacancies


The Mausolea & Monuments Trust is looking to obtain the services of a volunteer who can assist in its membership recruitment. The post will appeal to an individual who has some experience of membership management and an up-to-date knowledge of modern social media communication methods. Details online.


The National Trust is looking for new members to join the Historic Environment Advisory Group.
 
The Historic Environment Group is one of four voluntary Advisory Groups in the Trust, which together cover areas where external volunteer advice is greatly valued. Group members are highly respected professionals who give their time, as individuals on site and at bi-annual meetings, to advise on practical, reputational and policy issues. 
 
We are looking for colleagues who have a passion and extensive knowledge in these areas, who possess a curious mind, and a collegiate outlook. Experience producing or working with academic research would be beneficial but is not essential. The role requires a commitment of up to 15 days a year, and is for an initial term of three years with potential for renewal. Details online.

Propose a Lecture or Seminar


Please download and complete the Lecture Proposal Form, and email it to Amelia Carruthers (acarruthers@sal.org.uk), the Society's Communications Manager, if you are interested in giving a lecture at one of the Society's Ordinary Meetings (Thursday evenings at 17.00) or as part of our Public Lecture series (occasional Tuesday afternoons at 13.00). We welcome papers based on new research or themes related to the Society's field of interest: the study of the material past. You can view our current lecture programme in the Events section of our website.

Fellows are also encouraged to propose topics or themes for conferences or seminars that bring scholars and professionals from a variety of disciplines together to explain, discuss and debate our material culture. Please download and complete the Conference Proposal Form, and email it to Amelia Carruthers (acarruthers@sal.org.uk), if you are interested in helping us organise such an event.

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