This is your weekly update of new reviews on RogerEbert.com, the world’s preeminent destination for movie criticism, commentary and community.

Is this email not displaying correctly?
View it in your browser.

New Reviews at RogerEbert.com for the week of March 04, 2016

Here are reviews of this week's newest movies from RogerEbert.com. For these and more, including blog posts on everything from sci-fi and low-brow comedy to forgotten masterpieces of cinema, please visit our site and join the conversation.

Knight of Cups Poster

Knight of Cups

Review by Matt Zoller Seitz

Knight of Cups is not a young man's movie. It's an old man's movie. A philosophically engaged, beatific, starchild-as-old-man's movie.

Read the Full Review

share on Twitter Like Knight of Cups on Facebook Google Plus One Button Share on Tumblr

Songs My Brothers Taught Me Poster

Songs My Brothers Taught Me

Review by Godfrey Cheshire

A potent Terrence Malick influence only makes the film strong aesthetically and ethnographically, not dramatically.

Read the Full Review

share on Twitter Like Songs My Brothers Taught Me on Facebook Google Plus One Button Share on Tumblr

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny Poster

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny

Review by Brian Tallerico

Yuen’s sense of scope and skill with fluid fight direction and framing holds the piece together more than a typical, way-too-late sequel.

Read the Full Review

share on Twitter Like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny on Facebook Google Plus One Button Share on Tumblr

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot Poster

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot

Review by Susan Wloszczyna

Not as offensive as last year's Rock the Kasbah, but another cinematic waste of Tina Fey's talent.

Read the Full Review

share on Twitter Like Whiskey Tango Foxtrot on Facebook Google Plus One Button Share on Tumblr

London Has Fallen Poster

London Has Fallen

Review by Peter Sobczynski

A horrible and wildly unnecessary follow-up that might actually be worse than its predecessor.

Read the Full Review

share on Twitter Like London Has Fallen on Facebook Google Plus One Button Share on Tumblr

Cemetery of Splendour Poster

Cemetery of Splendour

Review by Sheila O'Malley

This is the potential of cinema, to show us experiences that lie beyond words.

Read the Full Review

share on Twitter Like Cemetery of Splendour on Facebook Google Plus One Button Share on Tumblr

The Boy and the Beast Poster

The Boy and the Beast

Review by Simon Abrams

Hosoda's knack for choreographing big action set pieces and quiet dialogue moments really makes his latest feature an emotionally rewarding crowd-pleaser.

Read the Full Review

share on Twitter Like The Boy and the Beast on Facebook Google Plus One Button Share on Tumblr

The Wave Poster

The Wave

Review by Brian Tallerico

It’s what one would call a “sturdy” genre pic—it doesn’t break any ground (pun kinda intended), but it gets the job done.

Read the Full Review

share on Twitter Like The Wave on Facebook Google Plus One Button Share on Tumblr

Emelie Poster

Emelie

Review by Glenn Kenny

Emelie is a tidy, nasty and often effective thriller that doesn’t quite blossom into full horror.

Read the Full Review

share on Twitter Like Emelie on Facebook Google Plus One Button Share on Tumblr

Trapped Poster

Trapped

Review by Nick Allen

A documentary made mostly by women (Dawn Taylor co-wrote with editor Sari Gilman), Trapped provides a refreshing perspective on an issue that has lost its personal connection through agenda.

Read the Full Review

share on Twitter Like Trapped on Facebook Google Plus One Button Share on Tumblr

Road Games Poster

Road Games

Review by Simon Abrams

By preferring to keep viewers in suspense until the film's finale, Abner Pastoll makes it harder to recommend a movie that has many good ideas, but no clue what to do with them.

Read the Full Review

share on Twitter Like Road Games on Facebook Google Plus One Button Share on Tumblr

Mavis! Poster

Mavis!

Review by Nick Allen

A finely-tuned, intellectual portrait of unique musical icon Mavis Staples.

Read the Full Review

share on Twitter Like Mavis! on Facebook Google Plus One Button Share on Tumblr

Other Recent Reviews:

Copyright © 2016 Ebert Digital LLC, All rights reserved.

Roger Ebert

Unsubscribe trrytrvrs@gmail.com from this list.
Update your subscription preferences | Forward to a friend

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp