Sarah Jamieson Yoga - November 2014 Newsletter
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Move well.    Breathe well.    Be well.

"If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together." – African Proverb


Slowing down.


In this month's newsletter, there is a subtle theme of slowing down and reflecting on what is essential. After being injured in a car accident in September, slowing down has been a necessity for me, but it hasn't always been easy. I've realized that I have a deeply ingrained habit of taking on too much, which is strongly reinforced by the culture around me. 

As we move into a time of year that is often very busy, what would it look like – and feel like – if you were to intentionally slow down?

With love,
Sarah
 

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Yoga for Pain Relief  ~  Now Offered in the Afternoon!

Course Details
Thursday afternoons, 3-4:30pm

January 8th – February 26th (No class Feb.5)
$150 for 7 sessions
Ocean and Crow Yoga*, 1707 Grant Street, Vancouver, BC
*Eastside Yoga has changed its name. Classes are in the same location. 

Learn more on my website and please email me if you have questions.

Click here to register online, or contact the studio director Julie Peters by email to arrange registration in person or by phone.
Taking Care

A lovely friend recently shared a practice with me from Sally Kempton's article Busyness Plan. In the article, Kempton differentiates between external busyness and internal busyness. External busyness is the straightforward state of having a lot to do, but internal busyness is different. It is compulsive. It comes from the feeling of not having enough time. You feel overwhelmed, driven by your schedule, and afraid of what will happen if you let something go.

Kempton shares a few different practices for managing internal busyness. Here is one that may be especially beneficial over the holidays:

Anti-Rushing Practice
This practice releases the compulsion that often arises when you’re in a hurry. Try it now, and then practice it the next time you feel yourself rushing.


Stop. Stand or sit totally still for one full minute. First, say to yourself, “I have all the time in the world.” Then, bring to mind the image of a buddha in meditation. Hold the thought of the image in your mind while you breathe deeply and slowly five times. Keep that image in your mind as you continue on your way.

You may enjoy making a cup of tea and sitting down to read the whole article.
Recommended Read
Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less, by Greg McKeown, may turn out to be one of the most influential books I will ever read in my life. I've taken so much from the book that it is hard to succinctly summarize what I've learned, but here are some highlights: trade-offs are inevitable, reflection is essential, and buffers are crucial. I highly recommend it to anyone who feels overwhelmed by how much they have to do – or want to do.   
Younger Next Year
 
Last month I watched the PBS special Younger Next Year: The New Science of Aging. It is only an hour long, and offers a simple and inspiring formula for aging well: move more and attend to your emotions. 
Autumnal Lessons:
Stripping to the Bone
 
Autumnal Lessons: Stripping to the Bone, by yoga teacher Rachel Scott, beautifully echoes my recommended read this month. I was struck by her question: "If you only had one goal for the next three months, what would it be?"
Pull Together:
RAVEN Trust

My husband is helping to raise funds to support the First Nations legal challenges to stop Northern Gateway. Click here to read more about this important cause. All donations made before the end of the year will be matched by a generous donor. 
Brainman is Back!
 
Brainman is the fictional character in the classic pain education video Understanding Pain in less than five minutes. I've shared this original video in my newsletter before but Brainman is back!

The return of Brainman is a short video (less than 3 minutes long) explaining why he decided to come back to the screen. 

Understanding Pain: Brainman stops his opioids looks at why opioids are not recommended for chronic pain.

Understanding Pain: Brainman chooses looks at the important things to consider for successful pain management. 
Thank You!

Thanks for taking the time to read through my newsletter. If you have comments or suggestions, I'd love to hear from you. Namaste. ❤ 
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