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The NDP announced a review of Site C shortly after forming government in July, but this month concluded that the project is too far along to cancel.

Site C hiring to get a makeover

BC Premier aims to include more apprentices and
diverse groups in finishing of Site C dam

As of October, only 18 apprentices were getting on-the-job trades training on the construction site of British Columbia's most expensive public-infrastructure project in history, out of almost 2,000 people working to build the Site C dam.

BC Premier John Horgan is not happy with that number at all.

When he announced his grudging decision to carry on with construction of Site C on Dec. 11, Mr. Horgan promised to revamp the terms of the project. The alterations are designed to ease the sting for the many New Democrats – including a large number in his cabinet – who opposed the dam because of its environmental, agricultural and First Nations impacts.

Part of Mr. Horgan's Site C turnaround plan is the promise of new "community benefit agreements" that will support local communities, as well as increase the number of apprentices and First Nations workers hired onto the project.

"We need to make sure we are training the next generation of skilled workers. We need to make sure we are including diverse groups, Indigenous people, women and others in these projects," Mr. Horgan said in a recent interview.

The NDP announced a review of Site C shortly after forming government in July, but this month concluded that the project is too far along to cancel.

Lana Popham, Minister of Agriculture, was one of several cabinet ministers who had campaigned against the project while in opposition. On her Facebook page, she explained that "our heartbreaking decision on Site C was necessary, but I am with so many of you in grieving the loss of agricultural land in the flood zone of Site C."

The new terms for the project include increased and independent oversight of the project and a fund, to come out of revenues from the completed project, for agriculture.

(the Globe and Mail)

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