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MY JUNETEENTH EPISTLE
 
Last year as we observed Juneteenth, Rev. Jane asked, and answered, “what is my part in this story?” Well, today I share my story  of growing up in the segregated south. North Carolina, at the time of my birth, was predominantly black and white. If you were anything other than white, you were black. 
 
My neighbors, church, school, teachers, doctors, public library were all black. There was even a special parking area downtown, not for black cars, but for black people. I was well cared for, protected and surrounded by love. What I didn’t know were all the limitations and restrictions placed on me and everyone caring for me. 
 
I was born in the colored section of the local hospital and delivered by a medical intern because my mom’s doctor was not allowed to practice in the hospital and no doctor on staff would deliver a black baby. I had entered, quite innocently, into a world that found my very existence uncomfortable. That day was the Fourth of July. 
 
At the time I was born, nearly 100 years had passed since the enslaved people in Texas learned of the Emancipation Proclamation. But now, unbeknownst to young me, there was a new groundswell movement underway to legislate change. Hope was in full bloom. My early years were spent in this transitional period in American history. I sensed from an early age that separate worlds existed. After I learned to read, I was a bit confused that most of the school books had the name of another school crossed out, the same school that my bus drove past a couple of times every morning and every afternoon as it weaved around the county to pick up all the black students and deposit us to our very own “central” school. 
 
But, when I was around eight or nine, the air in my innocent little world was charged with something that I didn’t understand. At some point it was given the name Civil Rights Movement. So much was happening all around me. And it didn’t always make sense. Why did church suddenly start ending with a hushed meeting down front where us kids weren’t allowed to hear what was going on? Why did my dad and all the other dads go to the utility company to pay their monthly bills in pennies? Why couldn’t we nor our neighbors burn lights this Christmas? I later learned these were protests against the local utility company for not having a single black employee. Why did my teenaged-aged sisters leave with their friends carrying signs and rehearsing chants? And why was my mom on her knees praying the whole time they were away? These turned out to be sit-ins at local lunch counters. 
 
Not unlike the enslaved people of Texas in 1865, southern students remained in segregated schools more than a decade after they were ruled to be unconstitutional in 1954. For a few years, our parents had to sign a form confirming that it was indeed their choice to send their children to a segregated school. Only a very few blacks selected to go to a white school, for reasons that were painfully obvious. Zero white students chose to go to a black school. 
 
In 1969, my school district, under threat of losing federal funding, successfully fully integrated the high school. My entire junior year was spent as a member of the team planning for that merger of the black and white high schools. Simultaneously, brand new alternative schools, oddly enough called Christian academies, were forming throughout the south, including my hometown. Meanwhile, the merged public school, which kept the name of the white school, had adopted a Noah’s Ark-like method of having two of everything, one black, one white. Two student council presidents, two newspaper editors, two homecoming queens, two team captains. Fortunately, by the time my sister was a senior three years later, the twofer system had been abolished. However, there are still two separate class reunions held each year. 
 
Yet, this is progress. Progress that couldn’t have been imagined when I was born. Change is indeed possible but it is slow and it is painful. It took quite a bit of legislating, some noise to generate attention, determination and cooperation on both sides and a lot of prayers. Looking back at how far we have traveled, embracing our history, gives hope for the future. 
 
– Marquitta Whaley 
CALENDAR FOR THE WEEK
(JUNE 26 – JULY 3)

 
SUNDAY, JUNE 26
(Masks recommended; vaccination & booster shots strongly advised)

8:00am – WORSHIP IN ENGLISH 

9:45am – Drop-in Summer Sunday School with Ms. Esperanza in Building A

10:00am – WORSHIP IN ENGLISH

Download the order of worship.

Join us on Facebook Live
*The service will be posted to our YouTube channel and website on Monday.*

12:30pm – MISA EN ESPAÑOL
Download the order of worship.

Join us on Facebook Live
*The service will be posted to our YouTube channel and website on Monday.*

THURSDAY, JUNE 30

10:00am –  Healing Eucharist in the Chapel
10:45am – Bible Study in the Commins Room


7:00pm – Weekly Watch: So Late So Soon (Join here.)
Click here for more information.
Meeting ID: 879 7197 5633
PASSWORD: 525

FRIDAY, JULY 1

4:00pm – Tea & Talk (Join Here.)
Meeting ID: 854 1573 9073
PASSWORD: 525

SATURDAY, JULY 2

7:30am-Noon – Homeless Ministry: Showers, Clothes & Food
Donations are needed!

SUNDAY, JULY 3

8:00am – WORSHIP IN ENGLISH 

9:45am – Drop-in Summer Sunday School with Ms. Esperanza in Building A

10:00am – WORSHIP IN ENGLISH


12:30pm – MISA EN ESPAÑOL
THIS WEEK AT ST. LUKE'S
GRATITUDE GIFT FOR LAMIA
 
As Lamia moves on to new life adventures, we invite members to contribute to a Lamia Gratitude Fund to express our thankfulness for her dedicated care of the St. Luke’s community these last seven years, and to bless her on her way. Checks can be placed in the Sunday offering plate or mailed to the Office but should note: Lamia Gift in the memo. Giving on-line is also encouraged.
DIOCESAN PRIDE CELEBRATIONS JUNE 26


On Sunday June 26, 2022 the Diocese of Los Angeles LGBTQ Ministry and the Cathedral of St. John invite you to two opportunities to celebrate God's love and LGBTQ+ Pride. First, the Cathedral invites members of the diocese to come for worship at 10AM for a special Sunday service in honor of LGBTQ+ Pride. Music will be provided by the Trans Chorus of LA and Canon Melissa McCarthy will preach. For more details visit stjohnsla.org.

Then from 2-5PM we invite you to gather with us at the Episcopal Residence in Pasadena as we celebrate the return of the annual LGBTQ+ Garden Party. CLICK HERE TO RSVP for the garden party. Location and parking details will be sent upon receiving your response.

We look forward to seeing you at one or both of these opportunities to gather in community as we celebrate 30 years of LGBTQ ministry in the Diocese of Los Angeles and continue the work of proclaiming God’s inclusive love available to absolutely everyone!
SAVE THE DATE!
AUGUST 21 CELEBRATE OUR WINI WILLIAMS CARTER COMMUNITY SERVICE SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS



Our newest Wini Williams Carter Community Service Scholarship recipient is Jade Martinez, a graduating senior at Poly High School. During the pandemic, Jade founded “Home Girls that Roll… to keep kids off the streets with wheel on their feet.” In addition, as a member of the Washington Neighborhood Association, she and her mother held “a Wellness Event in which we did aerobics classes and Zumba classes for anyone who wanted to come… and provided fruit, snacks, and water to everyone. It was a beautiful site and heart-warming.”. This fall, Jade will be attending California State University, Fullerton.

On Sunday, August 21, current and former Community Service Scholars will be invited to St. Luke’s so that we can celebrate them, hear about their learning activities in college, as well as their ongoing community work.
RALPHS COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION PROGRAM


Please consider supporting the St. Luke's Children & Youth while you do your weekly grocery shopping. Because of you, St. Luke's has received $86.94 this quarter from 17 households in the parish! If you haven't already, it's easy to sign up

Log on to the Ralphs website, enter your email and password (create one if you haven’t already), then click on your name on the upper right-hand corner. Verify and click on Community Awards to the left of your screen and enter our number TM857.

If you do shop there do make sure you are registered because we want to help them continue to support our Long Beach community. Thank you for your support!
COVID-19 POSITIVE CASES ON THE RISE
CONSIDER USING MASKS DURING WORSHIP



According to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, there is an increasing trend in the number of positive cases of Covid-19. Across the Episcopal Church we are taking precautions to reduce the number of positive cases, like a significant reduction in the number of days, activities, and people for the upcoming General Convention in Baltimore this July. 

I have witnessed within The Episcopal Church a 10% infection rate at three recent events, the meeting of the Executive Council in April, the Clergy Conference of the Diocese of Los Angeles in May, and the meeting of the Joint Nominating Committee for the Election of the Presiding Bishop that I attended in Baltimore last week. 

You can get free KN95 masks at your local CVS. You can also request up to 8 free rapid tests per household. If you have not requested yours yet, I encourage you to do so and have them handy. You can request them HERE.

Let’s stay safe, let’s protect one another,
Rev. Antonio  
LET US PRAY WITH YOU
 
In worship on Sundays and Thursdays, we name in prayer those who have asked us to hold in prayer and homebound members of our community. Our practice is to keep people on the list for 4 weeks unless asked to take someone off sooner or keep them on longer. Please, email the Office or Sister Susan Alice Metzmaker to add someone to our prayer list. Also, on Sunday mornings, please join our prayer partners in the Chapel for prayers of intercession, assistance, and thanksgiving.
SHARE YOUR CHURCH PHOTOS WITH US!



Do you have photos from St. Luke's events, gatherings, or activities?
Share them with the church office! Upload your images HERE.
A very special 'Happy Birthday' this month to ...

 
Estrella Ulloa – June 28
Jacqueline Sargent – June 28
Kim Rohde – June 28
Charles Albert – June 29
Sam Albertson – June 29
Kim DeCelles – June 29
Marquitta Whaley – July 4
Harry Horning – July 4
Marquitta Whaley – July 4
Luis Blazer – July 9
Brian Duarte – July 11
Travis Lodahl – July 11
Thom Allen – July 11
Chris Espinoza – July 11
Orlie Peter Johnson – July 13
Joyce Howard – July 14
Marc Rodriguez – July 15
Hektor Rivas – July 16
Joel Carmona – July 17
Julie Von Pelz – July 17
The Rev. Beryl Nyre-Thomas – July 22
Lore Benitez – July 22
Brad Stevens – July 23
Susan Van Wig – July 24

Cathy Franklin – July 28
Lori Prince – July 28
Marjie Toops – July 31


*If you would like your birthday added, please contact the church office*
Copyright © 2022 St. Luke's Episcopal Church, All rights reserved.


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